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Full text of "Catalog"

CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGICAL 

UNION 



AT CHICAGO 




2005-2007 CATALOG 



Catholic Theological Union 





A graduate school 

of theology and ministry 



table of contents 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 4 

GENERAL INFORMATION ^ 6 

History: In the Spirit of Vatican II 7 

Mission: Witness to the Gospel ■ 8 

Setting: "City of Big Shoulders" - 9 

The Bechtold Library 11 

Educational Technology , / , , 12 

Special Programs and Resources 13' 

Spiritual Formation Programs ■ > 17 

FACULTY 22 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 38 

Theology Degrees 39 

Dual Degrees 39 

The Curriculum ;. 40 

Degree Programs 42 

Master of Divinity Program (M.Div.) 42 

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program (M.A.RS.) 48 

Master of Arts Program (M.A.) 53 

Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Program (D.Min.) 59 

Certificate Programs 62 

Certificate in Biblical Spirituality 63 

Certificate in Cross-Cultural Mission 63 

Certificate in Health Care Mission Leadership 63 

Certificate in Liturgical Studies , 64 

Certificate in Pastoral Studies 64 

Certificate in Spiritual Formation 64 

Continuing Education 65 

Off Campus Learning . 65 

Evening and Weekend Classes 66 

Management Skills for Ministry 66 



table of contents 

Summer Institute 67 

Sabbaticals 67 

The Hesburgh Sabbatical 67 

The Institute of Religious Formation 69 

Ministry Study Programs 69 

Study Abroad Programs ^ 74 

Overseas Training Program ' ' 74 

COURSE OFFERINGS ^ ^8 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 124 

Admissions Policies 125 

General Admission Requirements 126 
Academic Policies i 131 

STUDENT LIFE ^ ^ 140 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION ^ ' 144 

Financial Aid 145 

Scholarships 146 

Policies 148 

APPENDIX _ - 150 

INDEX 158 



president's letter 



r^ 





CTU President Donald Senior, C.P. 



CTU offers you extraordmary 
opportunities to deepen your 
knowledge of our Catholic 
heritage and to prepare 
yourself to serve the mission 
of the church and the good 
ofthe human family. 



Dear Friends, 

Thank you for your interest in Catholic Theological Union. 
We believe that CTU offers you extraordinary opportunities to 
deepen your knowledge of our Catholic heritage and to prepare 
yourself to serve the mission of the church and the good of the 
human family. 

We are blessed with a superb faculty who are not only 
leading scholars in their fields but skilled and caring teachers. 
Chicago, and its lakeside Hyde Park university community where 
CTU is located, is a beautiful and dynamic world-class city, full 
of cultural, recreational, and educational opportunities. Our close 
relationship with the University of Chicago and neighboring 
divinity schools provides a valuable ecumenical dimension to 
the courses available to our students. 

CTU recently inaugurated an exciting new design of its 
academic curriculum, which includes a wide variety of offerings, 
including interdisciplinary courses and team teaching to help 
students integrate contemporary experience and the richness of 
our Catholic tradition. Core courses in the church's biblical and 
theological heritage, in the practice of ministry, in theological 
methods, and in the church's relationship with world religions are 
coupled with specialized courses in all of the relevant areas of 
theological inquiry. We truly believe this creative new curriculum 
will equip our students for the church of the third millennium. 

CTU has grown to be the largest Catholic school of theology 
in North America, and it enjoys an international reputation for 
excellence. We hope you will join us in this great enterprise. 
We look forward to welcoming you to Chicago and to Catholic 
Theological Union. 

-Sincerely, 




Fr. Don^d Senior, C.P. 
President 



general information 



Catholic Theoiogical 
Unkm is a place where 
good things happen, 
where people pur suing 
the priesthood study 
alongside lay women and 
men who are preparing 
for ministry. 




'^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



general information 



Introduction: Out of the Ordinary ^ 

This is not your average seminary. It's not your average university, 
either. And it's definitely not your average theological school. 

Catholic Theological Union is a place where good things 
happen, where people pursuing the priesthood study alongside 
lay women and men who are preparing for ministry or are just 
hungry for a life of the spirit. When you walk the hallways of this 
place, when you sit in a classroom or stop for lunch in the dining 
room... wherever you are, you will feel the difference. Here you 
will experience the church at its best, and you will sense a vibrant 
spirit everywhere. 

Our faculty are leading scholars and skilled teachers who 
deeply care about their students. Our students are people from all 
over the world, from all walks of life, who are pursuing truth and 
in the process, are coming to see faith in a new way. 

History: In the Spirit of Vatican II 

In 1968 three religious communities came together and founded 
Catholic Theological Union (CTU). Their vision was to offer 
seminary students a priestly formation that mirrored the spirit 
of Vatican II — the renewal of the church. 

Since the time of its founding Catholic Theological Union 
has become a world class school of theology and ministry with 
a student body that is a rich mosaic of women and men, inter- 
nationally and ethnically diverse, religious and lay, and multi- 
generational. The faculty is comprised of distinguished men and 
women scholars who author the leading books on theology and 
take time to mentor students. The academic programs have also 
expanded over the years to address the contemporary needs of 
the church within the context of a global society. 



general information 



Today, 32 religious orders send their students to CTU. In fact, 
one in every six religious order priests being ordained in the United 
States today is a CTU graduate. Over 3,200 CTU graduates serve 
the church across the U.S. and in 65 countries worldwide, working 
in a wide range of settings— parishes, homeless shelters, youth 
ministry, prisons, hospitals, schools, colleges and universities, gang 
ministry, hospices, and a myriad of other ministries. 

Identity: A Vision for the Church 

Catholic Theological Union is the largest Roman Catholic school 
of theology and ministry in North America, preparing women 
and men to serve the church throughout the world. CTU is a 
community of inquiry where faculty and students engage in the 
pursuit of unparalleled academic excellence, inspired ministerial/ 
pastoral leadership, and a spirit of devoted service. The setting 
for this collaborative effort is an urban, ecumenical, multi- 
cultural, and university environment. 

Mission: Witness to the Gospel 

The primary mission of Catholic Theological Union is the aca- 
demic and pastoral formation of students preparing for priest- 
hood and a variety of ministries in the United States and around 
the world. CTU also provides continuing theological education 
for clergy, religious, and lay persons. This process occurs within 
a community of faith in interaction with a living Catholic tradi- 
tion and ecumenical, interfaith, and cross-cultural perspectives 
and resources. Through its degree programs and other educa- 
tional and formational opportunities, CTU strives to educate 
effective leaders for the church whose mission is to witness 
Christ's good news of justice, love, and peace to people of all 
nations. 



general information 



Setting: "City of the Big Shoulders" 

In his poem "Chicago" Carl Sandburg describes this place as the 
City of Big Shoulders, a city of energy and strength where Catholic 
Theological Union is set. A sprawling giant of a city, Chicago's 
stunning skyline, tree-filled parks, and the sparkling blue of Lake 
Michigan are visible from CTU's windows. The third largest city in 
the United States, Chicago was shaped by the dreams, values, and 
resiliency of the millions of immigrants who came to this frontier 
outpost and built it into the global city of today. 

Chicago is also home to an impressive array of educational 
and cultural treasures — magnificent art museums and galleries, 
concert halls and theaters, professional sports teams, and arguably 
the finest architecture of any city in the United States. With some 
500 parks, 52,000 acres of forest preserves, a lakefront of continu- 
ous parks and beaches, and boulevards lined with flowers and 
trees, Chicago is among the most beautiful cities in the world. 

Known as a premier center for theological education Chicago is 
home to 12 theological schools and their libraries, several denomi- 
national headquarters, and countless religious organizations. 

CTU is a founding member of the Association of Chicago 
Theological Schools (ACTS), the consortium of theology schools 
which share a network of resources including library access, 
faculty interchange, symposiums and lectures, and some 750 
courses, open to all ACTS students, which are taught by 350 fac- 
ulty. The collective library resources of the ACTS schools num- 
ber 1.7 million books with over 5,000 periodicals. Through ACTS 
students and faculty can pursue their work, study, and reflection 
while interacting with people of many different cultural and 
theological traditions. 

It is the perfect place for CTU to call home. 



general information 



A Diverse Neighborhood 

Chicago is known as a "city of neighborhoods," each with its own 
distinct personahty and advantages. CTU is set in the culturally 
rich and ethnically diverse neighborhood of Hyde Park which 
enjoys a tradition of social activism, political leadership, and 
dynamic community life. Hyde Park is recognized as one of the 
most successful racially and economically integrated urban com- 
munities in the United States. On the shore of Lake Michigan, 
just south of downtown, Hyde Park is an energetic, cosmopolitan 
community anchored by the University of Chicago. With tree- 
lined streets, gracious old homes, and the stately buildings of the 
University, this Hyde Park neighborhood has the feel of an his- 
toric midwestern town. It is also one of the most religiously 
diverse areas of Chicago with churches of most major Christian 
denominations, several synagogues, a mosque, and Hindu and 
Buddhist places of worship. 

When the University of Chicago was established in 1892, 
founding president William Rainey Harper, a biblical scholar him- 
self, envisaged an academic village on the new campus that would 
include seminaries of many denominations. Today, the six theology 
schools known as the Hyde Park Cluster enjoy a national reputa- 
tion for excellence in theological education and resources. The 
cluster includes: Catholic Theological Union, Chicago Theological 
Seminary (United Church of Christ), the Divinity School of the 
University of Chicago, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 
McCormick Theological Seminary (Presbyterian), and 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (Unitarian). 

Hyde Park, which Money Magazine rated "one of the best 
places to live in the nation," has a lively downtown with bookstores, 
cafes, shops, and an amazing range of restaurants (Caribbean, 



10 



general information 



French, Italian, Japanese, Mexican, southern. Thai, Vietnamese). 
Vibrant cultural life abounds through the DuSable Museum of 
African- American History, the Museum of Science and Industry, 
the Oriental Institute Museum, the Smart Museum of Art, the Court 
Theater, Hyde Park's renowned bookstores, and Frank Lloyd 
Wright's Robie House. Public transportation to downtown Chicago 
and the two major airports is just blocks from CTU. 

The Campus: Making a place for faith 

In 2005, CTU began a major campus renewal project with the con- 
struction of a 95,000 square foot five-story academic center and 
the renovation of the 10-story building at 5401 S. Cornell Ave. In 
the new academic center, students will enjoy spacious classrooms, 
a state-of-the-art library, and expanded meeting and assembly 
spaces. The new building will accommodate the steadily growing 
student body as well as a portfolio of public programs and events, 
affording greater opportunities for learning and living. 

CTU's primary facility since 1968, the former Hotel Aragon, 
will be restored to its original purpose as a residential building 
with renovated rooms, a new full-service dining room, and 
offices. Nearby CTU buildings provide residential units, offices, 
and a few classrooms. When the project is completed, the new and 
the traditional will blend into a modern campus that enlivens and 
enriches this lakefront neighborhood. Beyond the bricks 
and mortar, CTU is building a future while making a greater place 
for faith. 

The Bechtold Library 

The Paul Bechtold Library holds 150,000 volumes including 
500 current periodicals, providing excellent resources for study 
and research. In addition to the general theological holdings, the 

11 



general infornnation 




library has special collections in mission studies, history of 
religions, homiletics, religious education (the Weber-Killgallon 
collection), Christian art, Morenna (St. Thomas More), religious 
life, and Franciscan studies. 

Library patrons have easy access to library resources in the 
city, the state, and the nation through CTU's memberships in the 
Association of Chicago Theological Schools, the Chicago Area 
Theological Library Association, the Chicago Library System, 
the Illinois Library Computer System Organization, and the on- 
line Catalog Library Cooperative. 



V 



1. he groim dhre liking fi 
CTU's new academic 
building was held in 
Jmmmy of 2005. 
Photo: Monte Geriach 



Educational Technology 

The John Neville Student Computer Center and a faculty com- 
puter lab are located in the Bechtold Library. The Neville 
Computer Center has full computing software and hardware 
facilities, Internet access, networked laser printers, and scanners. 
Technology professionals advise students on the use of the hard- 
ware and software. The Computer Center and faculty lab were 
created through a gift from Lilly Endowment Inc. 



12 



general information 

Special Programs and Resources 

The Bernardin Center for Theology and Ministry 

The Bernardin Center for Theology and Ministry was created in 
1997 to honor Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, whose pastoral leader- 
ship brought the reforms of Vatican II to the Catholic church in 
Chicago, and whose life and teaching continue to inspire people 
worldwide. Shortly before his death. Cardinal Bernardin 
approved the establishment of a center in his name at CTU that 
would continue to build upon his reconciling vision. 

An integral part of CTU, the Bernardin Center advances 
Cardinal Bernardin's vision through an array of initiatives 
focused on his signature issues of reconciliation and peacemak- 
ing, interreligious dialogue, the consistent ethic of life, leadership 
development for the church and Catholic Common Ground. 
Among the Center's distinctive initiatives are: 

The Bernardin Scholarship Program prepares promising stu- 
dents for a life of ministry and leadership. 
Catholic-Jewish and Catholic-Muslim Studies offer educa- 
tion and opportunities for interreligious dialogue among the 
Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faith communities. 
The Peacebuilders Initiative prepares high school students for 
lives of service. 

Catholics On Call invites young aduhs to explore the 
theology of vocation. 

Endowed faculty chairs: the Vatican II Chair in Theology, the 
Erica and Harry John Family Chair in Ethics, and the Crown 
Ryan Chair in Jewish Studies 



13 



general information 



The Bemardin Scholarship Program 

The Bernardin Scholarship program provides a unique theological 
education to those inspired by and drawn to the vision of Cardinal 
Bemardin. Open to applicants who are accepted as students for 
the Master of Arts or Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry degrees, the 
program provides a full tuition scholarship and participation in 
the Bernardin Colloquia seminars and theological reflections on 
the Cardinal's signature issues. As part of the scholarship require- 
ment master's degree scholars are 
apprenticed to CTU faculty 
experts in a signature issue. This 
apprenticeship affords a unique 
learning experience and hands-on 
practice in a particular field of 
interest. 

The Center also sponsors lec- 
tures, conferences, and seminars 
in areas of concern to the Catholic 
church and has earned a reputa- 
tion as a convener of events that 
foster dialogue among Chicago's 
Jewish, Muslim, and Catholic 
communities. 



Catholic-Jewish Studies 
Catholic- Jewish Studies has been 
integral to the life and mission of 
the school since its inception when 
faculty colleagues Rabbi Hayim 
Perelmuter and Rev. John T 








Adjunct Professor Rabbi 
Larry Edwards listens 
thoughtfully to a Shapiro 

lecturer. Photo: Monte Ceiiacli 



14 



general information 



Pawlikowski, O.S.M., laid the groundwork. Its mission is to pres- 
ent first-rate Jewish scholarship and address the practical concerns 
of Catholic-Jewish relations in a setting that prepares future church 
leaders. Today, CTU's Catholic-Jewish Studies program has an 
international reputation for its outstanding array of lectures, sym- 
posia, and conferences, including the Rabbi Hayim Perelmuter 
Conference and the Shapiro Lectures, and for its leadership in 
interfaith dialogue. Rabbi David Sandmel holds the Crown Ryan 
Chair in Jewish Studies. 

Catholic-Muslim Studies 

Funded through the James and Catherine Denny Foundation, 
Catholic-Muslim Studies is dedicated to building bridges of 
mutual understanding and profound respect between Muslims 
and Christians. The vision of the program is to create significant 
opportunities for the relationship between Muslims and 
Christians to deepen and to reflect the noblest values and highest 
ideals of their common spiritual heritage. 

Catholic-Muslim Studies sponsors academic study, publica- 
tions, dialogue, cultural events, public education, and interfaith 
social justice activities. Its annual conference provides an oppor- 
tunity for scholars, community leaders, and the media to come 
together to articulate and pursue creative avenues of dialogue and 
social action involving Muslim and Christian communities. 
Catholic-Muslim Studies works in close cooperation with the 
Council of Islamic Organizations in Chicago, as well as with 
such organizations as the Muslim American Society and the 
Islamic Society of North America. 



15 



general information 



Center of Centers 

Chicago lies in the heartland of the continental United States. 
CTU. with its unique history and mission, is at the center of the 
U.S. Catholic church. This vantage point, combined with CTU's 
distinctive character, has attracted a select group of distinguished 
national centers and programs to the campus, earning CTU the 
reputation as the "center of centers." 

The centers directly sponsored by CTU are: the Bemardin 
Center for Theology and Ministry, the Hesburgh Center for 
Continuing Formation in Ministry, the Institute of Religious 
Formation, the Chicago Center for Global Ministries (co-spon- 
sored by Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and 
McCormick Theological Seminary), and the Center for the Study 
of Religious Life (co-sponsored by the Conference of Major 
Superiors of Men and the Leadership Conference of Women 
Religious). 

The independent centers located on campus are: the Institute 
for Sexualit\' Smdies. the National Coalition for Church 
\bcations. the Religious Brothers Conference, and the National 
Religious Vbcation Conference. 

The Chicago Center for Global Ministries 
To meet the growing challenges of preparation for ministry posed 
by current trends in migration and globalization, CTU, the 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, and McCormick 
Theological Seminar}^ established the Chicago Center for Global 
Ministries (CCGM). The Center coordinates the considerable 
resources of the three schools and builds upon them to address 
these challenges in a truly ecumenical and catholic way. World 
mission and witness, cross-cultural studies, the study of and 



16 



general information 



dialogue with the world's religions, urban ministry, and studies 
concerned with peace, justice, and ecology receive special atten- 
tion. The Center coordinates and offers courses, provides oppor- 
tunities for faculty and student enrichment, offers cross-cultural 
immersion experiences, sponsors the annual Scherer Lecture on 
mission, and coordinates the annual World Mission Institute. 

Center for the Study of Religious Life 
Sponsored by the Conference of Major Superiors of Men, the 
Leadership Conference of Women Religious, and CTU, the pur- 
pose of the Center for the Study of Religious Life (CSRL) is to 
promote the viability of religious life. The Center conducts inter- 
disciplinary and intercultural reflection on the life of Catholic 
religious and designs and develops tools that resource religious 
congregations and their leadership. 

The Institute for Sexuality Studies 

The Institute for Sexuality Studies offers a one-month education 
program for those involved in clergy and religious formation, 
spiritual direction, pastoral care, education, and other forms of 
ministry. Through independent study guided by a tutor, a library 
with materials on all aspects of human sexuality, and seminars in 
psychology, spirituality, and moral aspects of sexuality, partici- 
pants explore areas of human sexuality. 

Spiritual Fornnation Progranns 

An important component of a CTU theological education is spiri- 
tual formation. There are three special programs that provide for- 
mation to lay women and men: the Tokon and Romero Scholars 
programs, which address the formation of the Tolton scholars 



17 



general information 



(African- American) and the Romero scholars (Hispanic), respec- 
tively, and the Emmaus program designed for all lay students. 
Religious orders provide formation for their students. 




Professor Ed Foley, 
Capuchin^ of the IVmrl and 
Worship Department is a 
popular speaker around 
the United States and 
abroad. 



Emmaus Program for 
Continuing Lay Formation 
The Emmaus program is the for- 
mation component required of all 
independent lay students* enrolled 
in master level degree programs. 
Through the practice of spiritual 
reflection, the Emmaus program 
assists students in forming a minis- 
terial identity that integrates 
personal and spiritual life with 
ministerial and academic 



experiences. 

The Emmaus program has four 
components: a choice of two of 
three retreats offered each year; 
spiritual direction with a qualified 
spiritual director; participation in 
the theological reflection groups 
(meet several times a semester); 
and two yearly covenant meetings 
with the director to outline and 
evaluate personal goals for the year. 
It also offers a variety of workshops, social gatherings, and 
related opportunities designed to support and fulfill the needs 
and interests of independent students. For students who commute 
and those working while studying in graduate school, Emmaus 



18 



general information 



offers valuable support and assists in connecting to the wider 
community. Graduates are invited to return for on-going forma- 
tion through any of the Emmaus offerings in order to minister 
more effectively to and with the people of God. For students 
preparing to be pastoral associates or directors of religious educa- 
tion in the Archdiocese of Chicago, the Emmaus Program coordi- 
nates its requirements with those of the Together in God's Service 
Program of the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

The Oscar Romero Scholars Program 

The Hispanic Catholic community is the fastest growing segment 
of the U.S. Catholic church. This is especially true in Chicago 
where more than one third of the 2.3 million Catholics are 
Hispanic/Latino. Jointly sponsored with the Archdiocese of 
Chicago, the Oscar Romero Scholars Program prepares 
Hispanic/Latino lay people for professional ministry by providing 
financial support as they earn a graduate degree. Scholars com- 
mit to work in the Archdiocese of Chicago for a minimum of 
three years after graduation. 

With formation as an integral part of the program, Romero 
Scholars prepare for ministry through either the Master of Arts in 
Pastoral Studies or Master of Divinity degree programs. Monthly 
formational and theological reflection sessions, annual retreats, 
and special workshops help the Romero Scholars develop and 
deepen a vision of ministry rooted in the Gospel — one which is 
practical, culturally sensitive, and personally enriching. 



^exceptions: Tolton and Romero Scholars 



19 



general information 



The Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program 
To meet the growing needs for professionally trained and cre- 
dentialed ministers in the Black Catholic community in 
Chicago, CTU and the Archdiocese of Chicago jointly sponsor 
the Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry program. The Tolton 
program provides graduate theological education and formation 
to qualified Black Catholic women and men who want to 
minister in the Archdiocese of Chicago. Tolton Scholars earn a 
theology degree with full financial support and commit to work 
in the Archdiocese of Chicago for a minimum of three years 
after graduation. 

Tolton Scholars participate in activities designed to enhance 
their own spirituality and integrate spiritual formation, academic 
understanding, and practical ministerial skills. All of these activi- 
ties take place within the context of the African- American culture 
in Chicago. This formation consists of twice-monthly theological 
reflection with other scholars, retreats, and participation in events 
and seminars. 

Formation Council 

The formation directors of CTU 's participating religious commu- 
nities, the director of continuing education, and the directors of 
the lay formation programs comprise the Formation Council 
where directors share experiences and insights relating to the 
spiritual dimension of priestly, religious, and lay formation. The 
council makes recommendations to the administration regarding 
policies that affect the religious well being of the student body in 
general, and of the students from participating communities in 
particular. Council members participate in academic and ministerial 
programs through representation at the Faculty Assembly and 
service on faculty and administrative committees. 

20 



general information 




A new crop of 
Bernardin Scholars 
are welcomed to 
CTU by Director 
Sheila McLaughlin^ 
far right, and 
Bernardin Board 
members Joan 
Lavezorrioy second 
from right, and 
Msgr. Kenneth Velo, 
far left. 



Liturgies and Prayer 

There are many opportunities for community and individual 
prayer. The Chapel is available to students for private and group 
prayer throughout the day. Students are also welcome at the 
liturgies of the participating religious communities. CTU also 
sponsors all-school liturgies regularly throughout the year. 
These celebrations mark important moments in the life of the 
community of faith of CTU. 

New Theology Review 

The New Theology Review is a joint project of Catholic 
Theological Union and Washington Theological Union. The jour- 
nal provides pastoral ministers with fresh and relevant resources 
that relate the various fields of theological study to issues in con- 
temporary culture. Although aimed at a readership that is prima- 
rily North American, the journal's purview is worldwide. Articles 
are solicited from the faculties of the sponsoring institutions as 
well as from other leading theologians and commentators. 



21 



faculty 





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Considered among the best theological 
scholars and teachers in the world, the 
CTU facility are also kn own for the time 
they devote to mentoring students. 
Authors of the leading books on theology 
and niinistiy, they are in constant 
demand as lecturers and speakers 
throughout the United States and abroad. 



22 



faculty 



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SCOTT ALEXANDER 

Associate Professor of Islam 

Director, Catholic-Muslim Studies 

A.B., Harvard University; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Scott Alexander's academic career has been dedicated to the 
study of Islam in the context of his broader training as an histo- 
rian of religions. His teaching and research interests include 
medieval Muslim sectarianism, the mystical traditions of 
Muslim spirituality, Quranic studies, and the history and future 
of Muslim-Christian relations and interfaith dialogue. He is 
editor of Sisters: Women, Religion, and Leadership in 
Christianity and Islam. 

MICHEL ANDRAOS 

Assistant Professor of Cross-Cultural Ministry ^ : ' 

Bacc. Theol., Kaslik, Lebanon; S.T.L., Pontifical Oriental Institute, Rome; 
D.E.A., University of Strasbourg; Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College 

Michel Andraos' extensive cross-cultural experiences and 
diverse theological background enable him to assist students 
to dialogue with and learn from other cultures. His areas of 
interest and research in theology include the praxis of social 
peacemaking and the development of this praxis as an integral 
part of the mission of the church. 




CLAUDE MARIE BARBOUR 

Professor of World Mission 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

Claude Marie Barbour is a Presbyterian minister who teaches and 
works in the areas of reconciliation, healing, and ministry (presence 
and accompaniment) among refugees and survivors of human 
rights abuses. Her theological and missionary interests focus on 
ecumenism, cross-culturality, and the intersection of gospel and 
culture. She coordinates courses and field placements in Native 
American communities in Chicago and South Dakota. 



m 



faculty 



A 



DIANNE BERGANT, C.S.A. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 
M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Dianne Bergant examines how ancient Israel functioned in the past 
and how it can be meaningful in the present. She is also concerned 
about how critical tools of modern scholarship can serve a theolog- 
ical goal. Her research interests include biblical theology and inter- 
pretation, the integrity of creation, feminism and liberationist 
perspectives, and world mission. She is author oi People of the 
Covenant and Preaching the New Lectionary: Cycles A, B,& C. 




STEPHEN BEVANS, S.V.D. 

Louis J. Luzbatek, S.V.D. Professor of Mission and Culture 

S.T.B., S.T.L, Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre 

Dame; Study: University of Cambridge 

Before joining the faculty in 1986, Stephen Bevans spent nine 
years in the Philippines teaching theology at a diocesan semi- 
nary. That experience colored the way he does theology and 
influenced his theological interests. His teaching and research 
probe issues in faith and culture, of mission theology (particu- 
larly its trinitarian roots), and in ecclesiology and ministry. He is 
author of Models of Contextual and co-author with Roger 
Schroeder, S.V.D. of Constants in Context: A Theology of Mission 
for Today. 




BARBARA BOWE, R.S.CJ. 

Professor of Biblical Studies 

Director of the Biblical Spirituality Program 

M.Ed., Boston College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; Th.D., Harvard University 

Several years of teaching experience in a Filipino graduate 
school of theology have instilled in Barbara Bowe an interest in 
the interpretation of the biblical tradition in cross-cultural con- 
texts. In addition, biblical spirituality is an underlying emphasis 
in her teaching. Her special research interests include Johannine 
and Pauline studies plus issues of early Christian ecclesiology. 
She is author of Biblical Foundations of Spirituality and 
Touching a Finger to the Flame. 



24 



faculty 




LAURIE BRINK, O.R 

Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies 

Head of the Biblical Study Travel Programs 

M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology; Ph.D. Cand., University of Chicago 

Laurie Brink investigates the ancient social, religious, and cultural 
world out of which early Christianity emerged. Promoting interdis- 
ciplinary research, she directs a project in which scholars of Roman 
history, early Christianity, and Jewish studies investigate ancient 
burial practices and the emergence of identifiable Christian prac- 
tices. A former senior staff member for the Combined Caesarea 
Expeditions, she continues her field work in archaeology. She is co- 
author with Marianne Race, C.S.J., of In This Place: Reflections on 
the Land of the Gospels for the Liturgical Cycles. 





GILBERTO CAVAZOS-GONZALEZ, O.F.M. 

Associate Professor of Spirituality - 

Director of the Hispanic Ministry Program 

M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; M.A., Incarnate Word University; 
S.T.L., S.TD. Pontificium Atheneum Antonianum, Rome 

A former pastor and youth evangelizer, Gilberto Cavazos- 
Gonzalez brings a wealth of ministerial experience to his studies 
and teaching. A particular concern to him is the relationship of 
Christian spirituality, pastoral ministry, and culture. His specific 
interests include medieval spirituality, Franciscanism, and both 
the Spanish and Mesoamerican roots of contemporary Hispanic/ 
Latino spirituality. 

EDMUND KEE-FOOKCHIA 

Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

M.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Catholic University of America; 

Ph.D., University of Nijmegen 

Edmund Chia is a Malaysian of Chinese descent who worked for 
the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences in Thailand. As 
executive secretary of the ecumenical and interreligious dialogue 
office, he was the interface between the Catholic church and 
institutions of other religious traditions in Asia. He has lectured 
widely on issues of Asian and contextual theology and is author 
of Towards a Theology of Dialogue: Schillebeecbc s Method as 
Bridge between the Vatican s Dominus lesus and Asia s FABC 
Theology 25 



faculty 




EILEEN CROWLEY 

Assistant Professor of Word and Worship 

M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Union Theological Senninary 

Eileen Crowley brings together the interrelated worlds of 
worship, arts, and communications. A liturgical scholar and 
professional communicator, she studies how these areas intersect 
in contemporary worship around the world. Her research into 
the use of multimedia arts in worship has led her to develop 
liturgical, pastoral, and aesthetic criteria for the evaluation of 
media-in-worship practices, Catholic and Protestant. She is 
author of Liturgical Ai^t in a Media Culture. 




BARBARA DOHERTYS.R 

Director of the Institute of Religious Formation 
M.A., St. Mary's College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Barbara Doherty is the former president of Saint Mary-of-the- 
Woods College, Indiana. Her doctoral work is in the area of 
South Asian religions. She has studied and lectured in Central 
and South America, Europe, Asia, and Polynesia. She has served 
on the national boards of the Leadership Conference of Women 
Religious (LCWR) and the Women's College Coalition and as 
president and executive committee member of the Indiana 
Conference of Higher Education. 



ELEANOR DOIDGE,Lo.B. 

Associate Professor of Cross-Cultural Ministry 

Directorof the World Mission Program 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminar/ 

Eleanor Doidge has prepared students for mission and ministry 
in cross-cultural contexts since 1983. Her own experience in this 
area includes inner-city ministry and dialogue with Native 
Americans and people of other faith traditions. She is part of the 
Cross-Cultural Ministry department's leadership team for immer- 
sion seminars among the Lakota Sioux in South Dakota. 



26 



faculty 




EDWARD FOLEY, CAPUCHIN 

Professor of Liturgy and Music 

Director of the Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Program 

M.Div., St. Francis Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

A member of the faculty since 1985, Edward Foley's interests 
include practical theology, the interplay of worship and the arts 
(especially music), ritual performance, and medieval Christianity. 
He studies the history of worship especially from the viewpoint of 
the action of the assembly. He is co-author, with Rev. Herbert 
Anderson of Mighty Stories, Dangerous Rituals: The Intersection 
of Worship and Pastoral Care and author of From Age to Age: 
How Christians Celebrated the Eucharist. 



#P "^^ 




ARCHIMEDES FORNASARMVI.C.C J. 

Senior Research Fellow in Ethics 

M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Archimedes Fornasari is a member of the Comboni Missionaries 
of the Heart of Jesus. His guiding and unifying concern is the 
regeneration of a Christian ethical language born from an 
ecumenical reading of the "signs of the time". It is a language 
capable of originating a Christian praxis which is both commu- 
nicative and revelatory, and which enables the church to find 
and give the reasons of the hope it is striving to live. 




RICHARD FRAGOMENI 

Associate Professor of Liturgy and Preaching 

S.T.B., M.A., University of Louvain; M.A., M. Music, Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Richard Fragomeni is a presbyter of the Diocese of Albany, New 
York. His work involves him in conversation with theology, inter- 
pretation theory, and poetry. His current work is in the field of 
word and sacrament: the intersection of symbolic activity and lan- 
guage as it creates insights into the Christian proclamation of 
grace. Central to his work is a fascination with the power of liturgy 
and preaching in the transformation of consciousness. He is author 
of Come to the Feast and co-author with Br. Michael McGrath, 
O.C.F.S., of Blessed Art Thou Mother, Lady, Mystic, Queen. 

W 



faculty 




MARY FROHLICH, R.S.C.J. 

Associate Professor of Spirituality 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

A fascination with the mystical dimension of both ordinary and 
extraordinary human Uves has focused Mary FrohUch's teaching 
and research. Her specific interests include reclaiming the spiritual 
classics as resources for today's needs, understanding the relation- 
ship between psychology and spirituality, and reflecting on the 
interplay of practice and theory in the developing field of spiritual- 
ity. She is author of St. Therese ofLisieux: Essential Writings and 
The Lay Contemplative: Testimonies, Perspectives, Resources. 




ANTHONY GITTINS, C.S.SR 

Bishop Francis X. Ford, M.M., Professor of Catholic Missiology 

M.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; Study: University of Cannbridge 

A personal priority of Anthony Gittins is to combine teaching 
and speaking with learning and listening. His research focuses on 
the dynamics of inculturation by using anthropological and theo- 
logical lenses and his pastoral outreach includes Chicago's disen- 
franchised and cultures from Africa to the Pacific. He is author 
of Ministry at The Margins: Strategy and Spirituality for Mission 
and^ Presence That Disturbs: A Call to Radical Discipleship 




ZACHARY HAYES, O.F.M. 

Professor Emeritus 

Dr.Theol., Friedrich-Wilhelm University Bonn, Germany; Litt.D., St. Bonaventure 

University; Litt.D., Quincy College 

Zachary Hayes is trained in medieval philosophy and theology, 
with a specialization in the work of St. Bonaventure. He has also 
done extensive study of modern Christian thought and is working 
on problems of contemporary theological cosmology and its rela- 
tion to the positive sciences. He is author of Visions of a Future: 
a Study of Christian Eschatology and The Gift of Being: A 
Theology of Creation, and translator of The Theology of History 
in Bonaventure by Joseph Ratizinger. 



28 



faculty 




PAUL LACHANCE, O.F.M. 

Adjunct Professor of Spirituality 

Director of the Franciscan Spirituality Program 

M.Th., Chicago Theological Seminary; S.T.L, S.T.D., Pontificium Atheneum 

Antonianum, Rome 

Paul Lachance is an internationally-recognized specialist in 
Franciscan mysticism and spirituality. He is the editor and trans- 
lator of Angela of Foligno in the Classics of Western Spirituality 
series, translator of Francis ofAssisi, Writer and Spiritual Master 
by Thaddee Matura, O.F.M. , and author and translator of several 
books and articles on Franciscan spirituality. 




RICHARD MCCARRON 

Assistant Professor of Liturgy 

M. A,, Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Richard McCarron is committed to authentic expressions of 
liturgy among particular communities of faith. He attends to the 
interaction of liturgical celebration and culture in past and pres- 
ent, engages the methods of critical hermeneutics to develop a 
dynamic theology of liturgy and sacrament, and aims to help pas- 
toral ministers realize the formative power of liturgy. 
He is author of The Eucharistic Prayer at Sunday Mass. 




THOMAS NAIRN, O.F.M. 

Erica and Harry John Family Professor of Catholic Ethics 

Director of Health Care Mission Leadership 

M.A., M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 

Study: University of Cambridge 

Although interested in a wide range of ethical issues, most of 
Thomas Nairn's research has been in the area of health care ethics. 
His current work has been in areas such as end of life issues, 
genetics, the interrelation between religious and cultural values in 
health care decision making, and organizational ethics. He consults 
for a variety of Catholic health care systems and helped develop 
the health care mission leadership certificate program. 



m 



faculty 







CARMEN MARIE NANKO-FERNANDEZ 

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Ministry 

Director of Field Education M.A., D.Min., Catholic University of America 

Carmen Nanko is a Catholic pastoral theologian with extensive 
experience in ministry, teaching, and administration. Her teaching 
and research, which reflect on ministry with youth and appreciation 
for contextual theologies, have focused on areas of Catholic social 
teaching, U.S. Hispanic theologies, and on the relationship between 
religion and popular culture. Her ministry includes involvement 
with diverse communities and demonstrates commitments to cross- 
cultural endeavors, ecumenical cooperation, interfaith relations, and 
mentoring of pastoral ministers and religious educators. She is the 
author of Campus Ministry: Identity, Mission, and Praxis. 

THANH VAN NGUYEN, S.V.D. 

Assistant Professor of New Testament 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; S.T.D., Pontificia Universita Gregoriana 

Applying narrative criticism, Thanh Van Nguyen studies the 
narrative unity of the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles as a 
whole, and analyzes the essential elements from the story itself 
and the way it is told. Narration, literary style, point of view, set- 
tings, characterization, and plot order help uncover the intention 
and message of the implied author and the anticipated or ideal 

^' ^ " WT^M^ response of the implied reader. Thanh has helped pastor churches 

^'" i in the West Indies. 

DAWN NOTHWEHR, O.S.R 

Associate Professor of Ethics 
IK . 
'?:^; ; M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology; Ph.D., Marquette University 

Mutuality as a formal norm, the ethics of power from a feminist 
perspective, and the relationship of ethics and spirituality are 
* ^ * Dawn Nothwehr's major interests. She is focused on empower- 

ment of the poor and vulnerable, human/environmental relations, 
,,y jf moral disagreement, friendship, and marriage. Her research 

includes how to deal with the "Other" when moral disagreement 
occurs and how Franciscan theology shapes ecotheology and 
ecological ethics. She is the author of Mutuality: A Formal Norm 
for Christian Social Ethics and editor of Franciscan Theology of 

the Environment: an Introductory Reader 
30 




faculty 




KENNETH O'MALLEY, C.R 

Director of the Bechtold Library 

A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Kenneth O'Malley is a respected expert in library management 
throughout the United States. Besides his service on accrediting 
teams of the American Theological Library Association in the 
United States, he has been a consultant to libraries in Australia, 
New Zealand, Guatemala, Nigeria, India, and Rome, as well as 
throughout the United States. He is president of the Catholic 
Library Association. 




JAMES CHUKWUMA OKOYE, C.S.SR 

Associate Professor of Biblical Studies 

L.S.S., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; M.A., D.Phil., Oxford University 

James Okoye embodies the multi-cultural emphasis so essential 
to the CTU experience. Educated in Nigeria, Rome, and England, 
he has worked extensively in Nigeria, Rome, and now Chicago. 
He has given much energy to the consideration of Catholic bibli- 
cal studies and African culture and to disseminating the scripture 
at the grassroots level. He is author of Israel and the Nations: A 
Mission Theology of the Old Testament. 




GILBERT OSTDIEK,O.RM. 

Professor of Liturgy 

Director of the Institute for Liturgical Consultants 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 

Study: Harvard University, University of California 

A founding faculty member of CTU, Gilbert Ostdiek explores the 
non-verbal languages of liturgy and draws on anthropology and 
ritual studies to understand how sacraments take on meaning in the 
community. His interests are the translation of liturgical texts (he 
served on the International Commission on English in the Liturgy), 
liturgical spirituality, and shaping places for worship. He is the 
author of Catechesis for Liturgy: A Program for Parish Involvement. 



31 



faculty 



r 




JOHN PAWLIKOWSKI, O.S.M. 

Professor of Ethics 

Director of the Catholic-Jewish Studies Program Ph.D., University of Chicago 

John Pawlikowski's extensive study of the Nazi Holocaust has 
enabled him to appreciate the ethical challenges facing the 
human community as it struggles with greatly enhanced power 
and extended responsibility for the future of all creation. His 
scholarly interests include the theological and ethical aspects of 
the Christian- Jewish relationship and public ethics. A leading 
figure in the Christian- Jewish dialogue, he is president of the 
International Council of Christians and Jews and author of Christ 
in the Light of the Christian Jewish Dialogue and editor, with 
Judith Banki, of Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust. 



'^^ 




AMANDA QUANTZ 

Assistant Professor of the History of World Christianity 

M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College 

Amanda Quantz received her doctorate in the interdisciplinary 
area of historical theology and visual art. Her research interests 
also include Franciscan religious history, the didactic role of 
Christian images, and the relationship between church and 
society in various periods. Her primary method in research and 
teaching is to examine the unique features of local churches in 
order to discern social trends, structural and doctrinal develop- 
ments, and other significant changes across space and time. 




BARBARA E. REID, O.R 

Professor of New Testannent Studies 

M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Barbara Reid, as a Dominican biblical scholar, has a keen interest 
in relating the study of the scriptures with the ministry of preach- 
ing. Her work on the parables and on women in the Gospel of 
Luke makes current feminist biblical scholarship available to 
preachers, teachers, and pastoral ministers. She is the author of 
Choosing the Better Part? Women in the Gospel of Luke and 
Parables for Preachers. 



32 



faculty 




GARY RIEBE-ESTRELLA, S.V.D. 

Associate Professor of Practical Theology and Hispanic Ministry 

Vice President and Acadennic Dean 

M.A., DePaul University; S.T.D., Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca 

Gary Riebe-Estrella treats traditional theological themes and 
questions of theological methods from within the experience of 
the U.S. Hispanic community. His research includes the role of 
Latino Catholics as church in the U.S., the world of religious 
imagination in Mexican popular religion, issues in multicultural- 
ism, and culturally responsible theological formation for Latino 
pastoral agents. He is co-editor, with Timothy Matovina, of 
Horizons of the Sacred: Mexican Traditions in U.S. Catholicism. 



^\ 




ROBIN RYAN, C.R 

Director, Catholics On Call Vocation Program 

Adjunct Professor of Systematic Theology 

M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Robin Ryan is a Passionist priest who has been engaged in retreat 
ministry, taught systematic theology, and worked with the 
formation of seminarians and lay women and men preparing 
for ministry. His scholarly interests include issues relating to 
Christology, Christian mysticism, and God and human suffering. 




DAVID SANDMEL 

Crown Ryan Professor of Jewish Studies 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rabbi Sandmel is the head rabbi for K.A.M. Isaiah Israel in 
Hyde Park and an expert in Christian Jewish relations. He was 
the Jewish Scholar at the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies 
in Baltimore, where he directed the National Jewish Scholars 
Project, an initiative designed to promote discussions within the 
Jewish Community and among Christians and Jews about the dif- 
ferences and similarities of the two traditions. He is co-editor of 
Christianity in Jewish Terms and lead editor of Irreconcilable 
Differences? A Learning Resource for Jews and Christians. 



m 



faculty 




ROBERT SCHREITER, C.PRS. 

Bemardin Center Vatican II Professor of Theology 
Theol.Dr., University of Nijnnegen; Study: Oxford University 

Robert Schreiter is an internationally-recognized expert in the 
areas of inculturation and the world mission of the church. He is 
interested in how the gospel is communicated in different cultures 
and in how a theology of reconciliation might shape missionary 
activity today. He holds the professorship of theology and culture 
sponsored by the Edward Schillebeecx Foundation at the 
University of Nijmegen. Among his published books are The 
New Catholicity: Theology between the Global and the Local and 
The Ministry of Reconciliation: Spirituality and Strategies. 




ROGER SCHROEDER, S.V.D. 

Associate Professor of Cross-Cultural Ministry 

M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; 

L.Miss., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome 

Drawing upon his extended experiences of ministry among the 
peoples of Papua New Guinea and the south side of Chicago, 
Roger Schroeder assists others in both preparing for and return- 
ing from their own cross-cultural mission and ministry. He also 
teaches mission history, the experience of religion, and has a par- 
ticular interest in initiationh. He is co-author, with Stephen 
Bevans, SVD., oi Constants in Context: A Theology of Mission 
for Today and author oi Initiation and Religion: A Case Study 
from the Wosera of Papua New Guinea. 



34 



faculty 




DONALD SENIOR, C.R 

Professor of New Testament Studies 

President 

S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain, Belgium 

Throughout his years of studying and teaching the New 
Testament, Donald Senior has been absorbed by the Gospels, 
both the Synoptics and John. A particular interest is the connec- 
tion between the theological and literary characteristics of each 
Gospel and the pastoral and missionary contexts of the early 
church. Familiarity with the history and landscape of the Middle 
East has also prompted a strong interest in the historical Jesus 
and the social and historical context of the New Testament. All of 
these issues, he believes, help make the biblical text come alive 
for the church today. A member of the Pontifical Biblical 
Commission he is general editor of the Catholic Study Bible and 
author of the four- volume The Passion of Jesus in the Gospel of 
Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John. ...: 



m 



faculty 



VISITING SCHOLARS 

The Chicago Province of the Society of the Divine Word estab- 
hshed the Divine Word Scholar-in-Residence program in 1976 to 
bring scholars from other countries to teach at CTU. These visit- 
ing scholars offer courses for one or more semesters. Other par- 
ticipating communities also sponsor various visiting scholars to 
enrich the curriculum. 



36 



faculty 



37 



academic programs 



w 





CTU offers three masters 
degrees, a doctoral degree^ 
six certificate programs, 
and a range ofcontimdng 
education opporiumties. 



38 



academic programs 



In 1967 Catholic Theological Union (CTU) was approved as a 
degree-granting institution by the Illinois Department of Higher 
Education. CTU offers three masters degrees, a doctoral degree, 
six certificate programs, and a range of continuing education 
opportunities that include the Hesburgh Sabbatical and 
Individually Designed Sabbatical options, Institute of Religious 
Formation, Management Skills for Ministry seminars, and 

Summer Institute. 

''■•,■ '■''', '"^ 

Theology Degrees 

M.Div: Master of Divinity 

M.A.P.S.: Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies , 

M.A.: Master of Arts (Theology) 

D.Min.: Doctor of Ministry 

These degrees are fully accredited by the Association of 
Theological Schools and the Higher Learning Commission of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Dual Degrees 

For students interested in combining a theology degree with a 
masters degree in another discipline, several dual degree pro- 
grams are available. A dual degree in social work and theology 
can be earned by combining a CTU Master of Divinity degree 
with either the A.M. degree through the University of Chicago 
School of Social Service Administration, or the M.S.W. through 
Loyola University of Chicago. 

By a special arrangement with the University of Chicago, 
students may also pursue a coordinated sequence of programs 
leading to the Master of Divinity degree from CTU and the Ph.D. 
from the University of Chicago Divinity School. 



academic programs 



The Academic Calendar 

Catholic Theological Union's academic calendar consists of two 
15-week semesters (fall and spring), a three-week intensive in 
January (J-Term), and a three- week Summer Institute in June. 

The Curriculurm 

Catholic Theological Union's master degree programs are shaped 
by an inno\ati\e curriculum that integrates the personal, intellec- 
tual, and interdisciplinary dimensions of theology and ministry. 
This curriculum models the interrelatedness of theological and 
ministerial disciplines, and interweaves theory with practice. The 
result is a holistic graduate theological education that prepares 
women and men for effective ministry in an increasingly global- 
ized world. 

Components 

The graduate theology curriculum has three primary compo- 
nents: 

The Core Curriculum is comprised of Foundational, 
Complementar}'. and Integrating Core courses based on par- 
ticular themes. 

• Area Requirements are courses that provide grounding in 
traditional theological disciplines. 

• Electives are courses that allow further smdy in particular 
areas of theolosv. 



40 



academic programs 



The Core Curriculum 



FOUNDATIONAL CORE 

4 team-taught courses by theme 




E 
<u 

JCI 
+-> 


Pastoral Practice 


The Art 
of Theology 


Religion 
in Context 


Tradition 


Requirements by 
Degree 

M.Div. 4 courses 

M.A.P.S. 2 courses 
Theology of Ministry 
Diversity in Dialogue 

M.A. Optional 


CO 

O 
u 


Theology of 
Ministry 


Theological 
Methods 


Diversity 
in Dialogue 


Sources 
Through History 


COMPLEMENTARY CORE 

Selected courses by theme 


E 

(D 

-M 


Pastoral Practice 


The Art 
of Theology 


Religion 
in Context 


Tradition 


Requirements by 
Degree 

M.Div.Track 1 3 courses 
Introduction to the Bible 
2 courses from 2 tinemes 

M.Div. Tracl< II 4 courses 

Introduction to the Bible 

1 course from each theme 

M.A.P.S. 3 courses 
Introduction to the Bible 
Living the Moral Life 
1 elective from either the 
Foundational or the 
Complementary core. 

M.A. Optional 




Liturgical 
Planning 

Communication 
for Ministry) 


Doing Systematic 
Theology 

Living the 
Moral Life 


Abraham s 
Children 

Cross-Cultural 
Boundaries 


Introduction to 
the Bible 


INTEGRATING CORE 

4 interdisciplinary courses by theme 


E 

(D 

_C 


Witness 
and Proclannation 


Liturgy, 

Prayer, and 

Contemplation 


Justice, Peace, 
The Integrity 

of Creation, and 
Reconciliation 


Inculturation and 
Dialogue 


Requirements by 
Degree 

M.Div 

Track 1 3 courses 

Track II 4 courses 

M.A.P.S. 

The God of Jesus Christ 
1 course from other 
themes 

M.A. Optional 


(D 

13 

o 
u 


The God of 
Jesus Christ 


Eccesial 
Spirituality 


Living the Values 

of the Reign 

of God 


Ministry Across 
Boundaries 



41 



academic programs 



A general description and the objectives of each of the four 
degree programs follows. A complete description of the regula- 
tions and requirements for these degree programs is published in 
the respective program manuals which may be obtained through 
the degree program directors. 




CTU students consistently 
praise not only the expertise 
of the faculty but also the 
mentoring they provide. 



The Master of Divinity 
Program (M.Div.) 

As the basic professional degree 
for ministry, the Master of Divinity 
program prepares students for full- 
time professional ministry in the 
Roman Catholic Church. The 
program consists of classroom 
learning, guided ministerial expe- 
rience, structures for integrative 
reflection, and personal/spiritual 
formation. 

The M.Div. has two tracks: 
Track I is designed to meet the 
needs of lay and religious men 
and women who will not be 
ordained; Track II is designed for 
candidates for the ordained min- 
istry, and follows the specifica- 
tions for the academic and 
ministerial formation as required 
by The Program of Priestly 
Formation (Washington: USCCB, 
2005). 



42 



academic programs 



Formation 

Formation is essential to the life and work of the minister, and is 
required for all students. For students who are members of reli- 
gious congregations the formational requirements of the congre- 
gation are considered integral to their program of study. 
Likewise, students in the M.Div. program who are not members 
of a religious community participate in one of three lay formation 
programs: Emmaus Program for Continuing Lay Formation 
(open to all lay students), Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry 
Program (for Tohon Scholars), or Oscar Romero Scholars 
Program (for Romero Scholars). Each program provides retreats, 
individual spiritual direction, theological reflection groups, and 
consultations with the respective director to outline personal 
goals for each year of study. A joint retreat of the three lay forma- 
tion programs is held annually. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who assists in selecting 
courses that fulfill program requirements and meet the educa- 
tional and vocational goals of the student. The Field Education 
Director oversees the student's engagement in supervised min- 
istry experiences. 

Course of Study 

Prerequisites 

A selection of non-credit courses in philosophy is offered to 
help M.Div. students meet the prerequisites in philosophy for 
this degree. Track II students can take Foundational and 
Complementary Core theology courses to meet the prerequisites 
in theology /religious studies. Advanced standing will be given in 



43 



academic programs 

those theological areas rather than credit. 

Foundational and Connplennentary Core Courses 
These courses introduce students to the broad range of theologi- 
cal issues and methods. Foundational and Complementary Core 
courses are required in the thematic areas of Pastoral Practice, the 
Art of Theology, Religion in Context, and Tradition. 

Integrating Core Courses 

These courses help students practice interdisciplinary theological 

reflection by focusing on four critical issues fundamental to the 

church's mission: The God of Jesus Christ; Ecclesial Spirituality; 

Living the Values of the Reign of God, and Ministry Across 

Boundaries. 

Ministry Practica 

Besides the Core Courses, all M.Div. students participate in a 
two-semester sequence of supervised ministry that is comple- 
mented by theological reflection and select workshops on key 
ministerial topics. In addition, M.Div. Track II students are 
required to participate in a supervised ministerial immersion 
experience. 

Area Requirennents and Electives 

Area requirements and elective courses enhance knowledge and 
skills in various disciplines by building on the Core Courses and 
offering more focused study in specific disciplines of theology. 
Track I students take 30 hours of area requirements and 9 hours 
of electives, while Track II students take 45 hours of area require- 
ments and 18 hours of electives. 



44 



academic programs 



M.Div. Tracks 1 


and II 


.;:" .' .,- ^■ 


Distribution in Credit Hours 






Track I 


Track II 


Prerequisites 
Philosophy 


9 


^t\\ ml^o 


Theology & Religious Studies 






Core Curriculum 




Foundational Core 


12 


\pjrtj) / 12 


Complementary Core 


9 


12 


Integrating Core 


_9_ 


12 


subtotal 


30 


36 


Area Requirements 






Bible 


6 


6 


Ethics 


6 


6 


Sacraments 


3 


6 


Doctrine 


3 


. 6 


History 




■ > 


Cross-Cultural 


3 


3 


Presiding 




' , .'3 


Preaching 




3 


Lay Leadership of Prayer 


3 




and Preaching 






Spirituality 




3 


Pastoral Ministry 


r' . ■ 


, ,"V,/' „3 


Spirituality or Pastoral Ministry 


3 




Canon Law 




3 


subtotal 


27 


45 


Ministry Practica < 






Ministry Practica 


:'6,:; 


6 


Immersion 




■ v/ ■■ 3 


subtotal 


6 


:> ' ■■ 9 


Electives [Concentrations] 


9 


18 


Capstone 


1 


1 


subtotal 


10 


19 


Total 


73 


109 



45 



academic programs 

Candidacy 

Students must apply for M.Div. candidacy when they have com- 
pleted 1 8 hours for Track I students or 27 hours for Track II students. 

Areas of Concentration 

While the Master of Divinity provides general ministry prepara- 
tion, students may choose to pursue particular fields of study by 
focusing their degree program in one of the following concentra- 
tions: 

Biblical Studies: further grounds ministerial studies in bibli- 
cal studies. 

Cross-Cultural Ministries: provides a cross-cultural focus 
highlighting cultural and religious pluralism. 

Health Care Mission Leadership: provides grounding and 
development in health care mission leadership. 

Pastoral Theology: allows focusing courses around a specific 
ministry. 

Liturgical Studies: provides further grounding and develop- 
ment in liturgy and preaching. 

World Mission: provides a focus on mission in the global 
church. 

Master of Divinity Prograrm Outconnes 

The graduate of the Master of Divinity Degree Program: 
1 . Exercises pastoral leadership in the Roman Catholic Church as a 
lay or ordained minister in a variety of pastoral, cultural and geo- 
graphic settings. 
1.1 Attains and nurtures a clear identity as a professional minister 



46 



academic programs 



1 .2 Engages in prayer and disciplined spiritual practices toward 
personal transformation and growth 

1.3 Ministers in a collaborative style respectful of others and 
their gifts 

1 .4 Values and builds community 

1 .5 Identifies and articulates problems and assists in their 
resolution 

1 .6 Administers material and human resources 

2. Knows and articulates the Roman Catholic tradition and applies it 
accurately, proficiently, sensitively, and faithfully 

2. 1 Interprets the Roman Catholic tradition in an historically 
critical and culturally sensitive manner 

2.2 Analyzes various kinds of texts, themes issues, and methods 
in a judicious and reflective manner 

2.3 Analyzes and interprets the Bible for believing communities 

2.4 Communicates the Roman Catholic tradition in written and 
oral forms 

2.5 Engages the moral and social implications of the Roman 
Catholic tradition 

2.6 Probes the Roman Catholic tradition as a living faith ever 
relevant to new situations 

3. Acquires pastoral skills and demonstrates competence in effective 
pastoral ministry 

3 . 1 Teaches in catechetical and other kinds of settings 

3.2 Preaches in various liturgical settings 

3.3 Presides at various kinds of liturgies and rites 

3.4 Counsels and consoles, exhorts, and challenges in various 
pastoral situations y 

3.5 Organizes and facilitates various kinds of groups 

3.6 Engages in theological reflection and spiritual guidance in 
various circumstances and settings 

3.7 Advocates for and strategizes with the poor and the marginal- 
ized 

47 



academic programs 




Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program 
(M.A.PS.) 

The Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies (M.A.RS.) is a profes- 
sional degree designed to enhance the student's ability to serve as 
a minister in the church. The program combines theological 
study, a focus on developing pastoral skills, and the integration of 
these two areas. It is designed for those with some ministerial 
experience, those who wish to prepare for ministerial leadership 
in the church, and those who want to improve effectiveness in 
their current ministries. Within the Master of Arts in Pastoral 
Studies degree program students may earn their degree with or 
without a concentration in a specific area of interest. 

As a program providing specific ministerial skills and 
competencies as well as general theological understanding, the 
M.A.PS. differs from the M.A. and therefore cannot be pursued 
concurrently with it. However, work done in the M.A.PS. pro- 
gram may be applied toward the M.Div. program. Certificate 
program work can be applied toward the M.A.PS. degree. 



Sn Barbara Reid, 
0,R, professor of 
New Testament, 
chats with a 
student after class. 

Photo: Daniel 
O'Connell 



48 



academic programs 



The M.A.RS. program consists of 48 semester hours: 21 
in the Core Curriculum, 21 in Area Requirements, and 6 in 
Integrating Requirements. Those with years of ministry experi- 
ence and those with non-credit ministerial training, may apply for 
9 to 12 credits, which can be applied toward the M.A.RS degree. 

Credit hours for prior learning may be awarded to those who 
have: v 

Completed an Archdiocesan or Diocesan approved Lay 

Ministry Education/Formation Program (up to 9 semester 

credit hours) 

Completed an Archdiocesan or Diocesan approved 

Permanent Deaconate Education/Formation Program (up to 

12 semester credit hours) 

Sustained supervised ministerial experience (can be applied 

to the 3 hour ministry practicum) 
Contact the Director of the M.A.RS. program for details. 

Formation 

Formation is essential to the life and work of the minister and is 
required for all students. For students who are members of reli- 
gious congregations the formational requirements of the congre- 
gation are considered integral to their program of study. 
Likewise, students in the M.A.RS. program who do not belong to 
a religious community, participate in one of three lay formation 
programs: Emmaus Program for Continuing Lay Formation 
(open to all lay students), Augustus Tohon Pastoral Ministry 
Program (for Tolton Scholars), or Oscar Romero Scholars 
Program (for Romero Scholars). Each program provides retreats, 
individual spiritual direction, theological reflection groups, and 



49 



academic programs 



consultations with the respective director to outUne personal 
goals for each year of study. A joint retreat of the three lay forma- 
tion programs is held annually. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who assists in selecting 
courses that fulfill program requirements and meet the educa- 
tional and vocational goals of the student. 

Areas of Concentration 

Students may focus their studies in the following concentrations: 

Biblical Studies 

Cross-Cultural Ministries 

Hispanic Pastoral Studies 

Liturgical Studies 

Spirituality 

World Mission 
Specific requirements for these concentrations are described in 
the M.A.P.S. program manual which can be obtained through the 
M.A.P.S. program director. 

Course of Study 

Foundational Core Courses 

These courses introduce students to the broad range of theologi- 
cal issues and methods. M.A.P.S. students are required to take 6 
hours (2 courses) of Foundational Core courses: 

Theology of Ministry 

Diversity in Dialogue 



50 



academic programs 



Complementary Core Courses 

The M.A.P.S. program requires 6 hours (2 courses) in the 

Complementary Core: 

Introduction to the Bible 

Living the Moral Life 

Core Elective Course ' " . 

The M.A.P.S. program requires 3 hours (1 other course) chosen 

from the Foundational or Complementary Core courses 

Integrating Core Courses 

These courses offer students the opportunity to practice interdis- 
ciplinary theological reflection focused on issues that are funda- 
mental to the church's mission. The M.A.P.S. program requires 6 
hours (2 courses) in the Integrating Core: 

The God of Jesus Christ 

Integrating Core course of student's choice 

Area Requirements 

M.A.P.S. students take 21 hours of Area Requirements including 

a supervised Ministry Practicum. 

Integrating Requirements 

The integrating requirements of the M.A.P.S. degree are: 

The M.A.PS. Colloquium 

Collaborative Skills for Ministry 

The Capstone Paper ^' 



51 



academic programs 



MARS. 
Distribution in Credit Hours 
Core Curriculum 

Foundational Core 6 

Complementary Core 6 

Core Elective 3 

Integrating Core _6_ 

subtotal 21 



Area Requirements 
without a concentration 

Bible 3 

Doctrine or History 3 

Ethics 3 
Spirituality or 

Pastoral Ministry 3 

Sacraments 3 
Lay Leadership of 

Prayer & Preaching 3 

Ministry Practicum _3-. 

subtotal 2 1 



with a concentration 
Lay Leadership of 

Prayer & Preaching 
Five courses in the 

concentration 
Ministry Practicum 
subtotal 



15 
21 



Integrating Requirements 
Collaborative Skills 

for Ministry 
MAPS Colloquium 
Capstone Paper 
Total 



2 
2 

48 



52 



academic programs 



Master of Arts Program (M.A.) 

Two types of Master of Arts (Theology) degrees are offered: the 
Research M.A. and the General Academic M.A. The hallmark of 
the M.A. program is flexibility with the individual student's pro- 
gram negotiated among the student, the academic advisor, and 
the M.A. director. One can pursue the M.Div. and M.A. programs 
concurrently. 

Formation 

Formation is essential to the life and work of the minister, and 
is required for all students. For students who are members of 
religious congregations the formational requirements of the 
congregation are considered integral to their program of study. 
Likewise, students in the M.A. program who do not belong to 
a religious community participate in one of three lay formation 
programs: Emmaus Program for Continuing Lay Formation 
(open to all lay students), Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry 
Program (for Tolton Scholars), or Oscar Romero Scholars 
Program (for Romero Scholars). Each program provides retreats, 
individual spiritual direction, theological reflection groups, and 
consultations with the respective director to outline personal 
goals for each year of study. A joint retreat of the three lay forma- 
tion programs is held annually. 

Advising 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who assists in selecting 
courses that fulfill program requirements and meet the educa- 
tional and vocational goals of the student. 



53 



academic programs 



Areas of Concentration 

The Research and General M.A. programs both offer areas of 
concentration in a multidisciplinary format. Students may choose 
to pursue a particular field of study by focusing on one of the fol- 
lowing M.A. concentrations: 

Biblical Studies 

Church History 

Cross-Cultural Ministries 

Ethics 

Liturgical Studies 

Old Testament 

New Testament 

Spirituality 

Systematic Theology 

World Mission 
The requirements for each concentration are described in the 
M.A. program manual which may be obtained through the M.A. 
program director. 

A multidisciplinary M.A. is also available. For more infor- 
mation on the Multidisciplinary M.A., please contact the M.A. 
Director. 

Research M.A. 

The Research M.A. provides the theological background for 
those who wish to prepare for entrance into a doctoral program, 
teach at the secondary or college level, or develop greater 
academic expertise in theological studies. The program requires 
36 semester hours distributed as follows: 24 hours (8 courses) 
in the area of concentration, 9 hours (3 courses) in another 



54 



academic programs 



theological discipline, and 3 hours for the thesis. Students may 
choose courses from the Core Curriculum that fulfill their 
academic goals. 

Course of Study 

Research M. A. 

Distribution in Credit Hours 

Prerequisites in theology 1 8 

Prerequisites in philosophy 6 



Area of Concentration 


24 


Theological Discipline 


9 


Thesis 


^ 


total 


36 



Prerequisites 

Students entering the Research M.A. program need 18 semester 
hours in theology or equivalent preparation and background in 
philosophy. Foundational and Complementary Core courses are 
offered to meet the prerequisites for theology and a selection of 
non-credit courses in philosophy is available as well. 

Language Competence ■' 

During their course of study students in the Research M.A. pro- 
gram must develop a reading knowledge of at least one modern 
research language other than English. Those concentrating in 
biblical studies must develop a proficiency in Hebrew and Greek. 
Those concentrating in historical and doctrinal studies or in 
liturgy must become proficient in Latin. Students should be 
ready to demonstrate their language competency as early as 



55 



academic programs 



possible in their program. Language courses are available in 
Hyde Park. 

After course work is completed, students take a two-part 
comprehensive examination to demonstrate their grasp of theo- 
logical method and the content of the disciplines in their pro- 
gram. The final requirement is a thesis in which students 
demonstrate their ability to do competent work in their area of 
concentration and give evidence of research skills and critical 
thought. 

General Academic MA 

The General Academic M. A. provides the theological back- 
ground for those who wish to teach at the secondary or college 
level or want to develop greater academic expertise in theological 
studies. Prerequisites: see Research M.A. 

Course of Study 

The program consists of 36 hours of course work distributed as 
follows: 24 hours (8 courses) in the area of concentration and 12 
hours (4 courses) in another theological discipline. Students may 
choose courses from the Core Curriculum that fulfill their 

academic goals. 

General AcademicM.A. 

Distribution in Credit Hours 

Area of Concentration 24 

Theological Discipline AZ 

total 36 



56 



academic programs 



CTU's student body 
's a blend of lay min- 
'sters and ordina- 
ion candidates, 
both men and 
womeny of many 
%ges and ethnicities. 

Photo: Daniel O'Conneil 




There is no language requirement except for students concen- 
trating in Biblical Studies, Old Testament, or New Testament, 
who therefore need a basic knowledge of Hebrew and Greek. 

Following completion of course work, there is a two-part 
comprehensive examination. The content and approach of the 
examination are described in the M.A. Program Manual. No the- 
sis is required for the General Academic M.A. 



Master of Arts in Theology Program Outcomes 

1 . The graduate of the Master of Arts program: 

1 . 1 Knows the content of particular areas of the Catholic 
tradition appropriate to the master's level 

1 .2 Demonstrates familiarity with contemporary issues in 
Christian living today 

1 .3 Recognizes and critiques the strengths and weaknesses in 
diverse schools of theology 

1 .4 Engages in critical and respectful dialogue with other 
Christian traditions and religious ways 



57 



academic programs 



1 .5 Profits from and utilizes a variety of theological and cultural 
perspectives 

1 .6 Evidences commitment to continued personal transformation 

1 .7 Evidences commitment to personal theological integration 

2. The graduate of the Master of Arts (General Academic) satisfies 
the performance outcomes of the Master of Arts degree as well as 
the following: 

2.1 Evidences commitment to personal theological integration 

2.2 Appreciates the importance of other theological and cultural 
perspectives for personal growth 

2.3 Teaches from a perspective of diversity 

3. The graduate of the Master of Arts (Research) satisfies the 
performance outcomes of the Master of Arts degree as well as 
the following: 

3.1 Demonstrates proficiency in engaging in academic study and 
research 

3.2 Demonstrates knowledge of a variety of theological methods 
used in intentional ways 

3.3 Acquires and applies skills required for the pursuit of 
doctoral studies 



58 



academic programs 



Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Progrann (D.Min.) 

The Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry program, offered jointly by 
Catholic Theological Union, the Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago, and McCormick Theological Seminary, is an advanced 
professional degree for lay and ordained ministers. The purpose 
of the program is to help those with significant experience in 
ministry integrate advanced theological study with the develop- 
ment of pastoral skills to enhance the practice of ministry. 

Program Design 

The D.Min. program balances the acquisition of content and the 
development of skills brought together in an integrated fashion. 
The program uses peer, supervised, and self-directed learning 
experiences along with classroom instruction. 

Concentrations 

Students choose one of the following three concentrations as a 

focus for the D.Min. program: 

Cross-Cultural Ministries: The cross-cultural ministries con 
centration centers on areas of ministry where cultural differ 
ences raise special challenges to pastoral and missionary 
activity. The concentration is interdisciplinary and ecumeni- 
cal in scope. 

Liturgical Studies: The concentration in liturgical studies has 
the goal of serving the entire worship event to make it more 
authentic and effective. It combines historical and systematic 
studies with pastoral methods to enable students to construct 
worship in the light of liturgical traditions and to assess the 
effectiveness of worship in particular communities. 



59 



academic programs 



spirituality: The concentration in spirituality is designed to 
enhance the reflective and pastoral skills of those whose min- 
isterial goal is to foster spiritual development through leader 
ship within Christian communities. The concentration 
emphasizes the leader's growth in theological, historical, and 
cross-cultural awareness and in pastoral expertise. 

Program Structure 

The program requires 30 hours of course work (10 courses at the 

seminar level). These are distributed as follows: 

Core Colloquia 6 

Electives 18 

Thesis-project _6 

Total 30 

The minimum time required for completion of the program com- 
ponents, except for the thesis- project, is one academic year plus 
a week-long intensive module. Preparation and approval of the 
thesis-project usually involve one academic year. Students may 
pursue the program on a part-time basis, provided they have com- 
pleted Core Colloquia I and II in their first year. 

Core Colloquia 

In the two core colloquia, students explore methodological 
frameworks for ministry from the perspective of their experience. 
In Core Colloquium I students consider the nature of ministry 
and its methods, primarily through case studies. Core 
Colloquium II explores questions of ministerial leadership and 
prepares the students to write their thesis-projects. 



60 



academic programs 



Electives 

The 18 hours of electives are ordinarily distributed to include 12 
hours (four courses) in the area of concentration and six hours 
(two courses) outside of the area. Requirements specific to each 
concentration are described in the D.Min. program manual. 

Thesis-Project 

Upon completion of their course work and admission to candi- 
dacy, students write a thesis-project. This thesis-project addresses 
the nature and practice of ministry in the area of concentration. 
Candidates are to identify a specific concern in ministry, bringing 
to bear both the appropriate literature and critical theological 
reflection, and propose a response. 

Evaluations 

All students are evaluated at three specific times during their pro- 
gram. The initial evaluation follows Core Colloquium I at the end 
of the fall semester. The second is the candidacy evaluation 
which assesses the student's development and prospects for suc- 
cessful completion of the program. This evaluation takes place 
after Core Colloquium II. The final evaluation is the approval of 
the completed thesis-project. A complete description of these 
evaluations can be found in the D.Min. program manual. 

Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Progrann Outconnes 
The graduate of the Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry degree is 
able to: 

1 . Provide leadership within a community of faith as a practical 
theologian through an ability to: 



61 



academic programs 



1 . 1 Minister out of a well articulated theology of ministry 

1 .2 Lead in a collaborative mode 

1 .3 Attend to the breadth of community experience 

1.4 Suspendjudgment in the process 

1.5 Name and respect difference 

1 .6 Empower the marginalized 

1.7 Demonstrate a notable level of personal integrity 
Form others as practical theologians by an ability to 

2. 1 Demonstrate an acquaintance with the leading authors in 
practical theology 

2.2 Reflect systematically upon: 

2.2.1 Culture 

2.2.2 Experience 

2.2.3 Religious tradition 

2.3 Correlate critically these sources 

2.4 Show awareness of one's own presuppositions 

2.5 Exercise a hermeneutic of suspicion 



Certificate Programs 

Certificate programs are offered in six distinctive areas of theo- 
logical study. Certificates are designed for those who want to 
continue their theological education or prepare for new min- 
istries. Certificates are awarded for 24 hours of course work (8 
courses), the equivalent of 2 semesters of study. Students may 
earn certificates in the following areas: 



62 



academic programs 

Certificate in Biblical Spirituality 

The certificate in Biblical Spirituality combines course work, 
special seminars, and prayer centered on the Bible as the basis of 
Christian living and experience. This program ordinarily begins 
with the fall study program in Israel followed by ongoing course 
work at CTU. Alternative ways of fulfilling the 24 hours of 
course work are possible. Students may choose from the course 
offerings of the Biblical Literature and Languages department or 
from the course offerings of other departments. Credits earned in 
this certificate program can be applied toward the Master of Arts 
in Pastoral Studies degree (M.A.P.S.) which can be earned by 
extending study for an additional year. 

Certificate in Cross-Cultural Mission 

This certificate consists of 8 courses. An introductory course is 
followed by courses in mission history, mission or cross-cultural 
methodology, and one cultural area. Most courses are electives 
allowing the student flexibility to explore a variety of issues in 
theological disciplines while maintaining a cross-cultural mission 
perspective. Returned and furloughed missionaries and those 
preparing for a ministry in a cross-cultural setting will find this 
certificate program particularly beneficial. 

Certificate in Health Care Mission Leadership 

This certificate is designed to prepare the student for work in the 
area of health care mission effectiveness. Its aim is to help 
develop those competencies for health care mission leadership as 
articulated by the Catholic Health Association. The 8 courses are 
divided among 4 areas: 

Foundational work in theology and ethics 



m 



academic programs 



Advanced theology and ethics 

Health care leadership issues 

Integration: an internship is required as part of the integrative 

area. 

Certificate in Liturgical Studies 

This certificate requires 1 5 hours in the area of liturgy and 9 
hours in doctrinal studies. Each student develops an individual 
program in consultation with the Director of the Certificate 
Program. 

Certificate in Pastoral Studies 

This is the most general and least structured certificate program. 
Students can design a program to meet their individual needs, 
enrolling in any 8 courses (24 hours). Students shape their pro- 
gram of studies in consultation with the Director of the 
Certificate Program. It is strongly suggested that students include 
some pastoral ministry courses in their curriculum for this cer- 
tificate. 

Certificate in Spiritual Formation 

This certificate program is useful for formation directors, those 
desiring an academic background to enhance a ministry of spiri- 
tual direction, those who want to augment their preparation for 
other spiritual ministries, or those who wish to do a year's study 
in spirituality without the constraints of a degree program. 
Students may design a personalized plan of 8 courses which 
should include Issues in Spiritual Formation and 7 other spiritual- 
ity or ministry courses. 



64 



academic programs 



Continuing Education ' ■• 

Through an impressive hst of offerings and diversity of formats, 
the Office of Continuing Education offers an abundance of edu- 
cational opportunities for professional and personal development 
throughout the year. Students select the courses and format that 
best fulfill their specific goals, and then create their own sched- 
ule. In addition to day, evening, 
and weekend classes the offer- 
ings for Continuing Education 
include the Hesburgh 
Sabbatical and Individual ^ 
Sabbatical programs, the 
Summer Institute, and the 
Management Skills for 
Ministry seminars. Learn at 
your own pace in the learning 
environment that best fits your 
needs. 



Off Campus Learning 

To accommodate the busy lives 
of students earning a degree, 
retooling ministry skills, or 
deepening spiritual enrichment, 
classes are offered at several 
convenient locations in the 
Chicagoland area: 

Chicago Loop (downtown) 

Gary, Indiana 

Joliet, Illinois 






Cfmtinmng education classes 
enable adult students to learn 
(it their own pace in a 
convenient setting and time. 

Photo: David Kamha, 



65 



academic programs 



Courses at these locations can be taken for credit or for continu- 
ing education units (CEUs). 

Evening and Weekend Classes 

To better meet the intellectual and spiritual needs of those with 
demanding schedules, a rich array of graduate-level courses are 
offered on evenings and Saturdays. Check the CTU website 
(www.ctu.edu) for the most current offerings. 

Managennent Skills for Ministry 

{Collaborative Skills for Administration in Ministry) 
These special seminars, developed for and targeted to those in 
ministry, are offered throughout the year and focus on six signifi- 
cant areas of pastoral administration that are necessary in running 
any organization. Taught by experts and practitioners in each 
field in an interactive style, the seminars present foundational 
principles and give practical information on the following topics: 

Leadership Styles 

Workplace Relationships 

Personnel Issues 

Financial and Facilities Management 

Public Relations and Marketing 

Stewardship and Fundraising. 
In these seminars future and experienced ministry leaders learn 
how to: 

1 . Understand their stewardship responsibility for ministry 
resources — people, money, facilities, and property; 

2. Develop a basic knowledge of pastoral administration in 
order to work collaboratively with staff and colleagues. 



66 



academic programs 

While the seminars are a requirement of the M.Div. and M.A.P.S. 
degree programs, they are open to those who wish to take them 
for graduate credit or for continuing education. 

The Summer Institute 

The Summer Institute provides a convenient and economical 
opportunity to update and enhance ministry skills and deepen 
theological and spiritual understanding. Offered for three weeks 
in June, the Summer Institute's intensive courses meet for two 
and one half hours daily for five days. Areas of study include 
scripture, leadership, liturgy, world religions, pastoral ministry, 
and spirituality. Conveniently scheduled morning, afternoon, late 
afternoon, and evening, the courses can be taken for graduate 
credit or for continuing education. Liturgy and common prayer 
are offered daily. The Summer Institute attracts international stu- 
dents as well as students from across the United States. 

Sabbaticals 

The sabbatical provides time away to refresh the spirit, hone and 
update ministry skills, and deepen knowledge and faith. For those 
ministering in the church Catholic Theological Union offers two 
sabbatical options: the Hesburgh Sabbatical and the Individually- 
Designed Sabbatical. 

The Hesburgh Sabbatical 

The Hesburgh Sabbatical is a four-month residential program 
that takes place in a learning community of experienced men and 
women who seek spiritual, academic, and physical renewal. The 
curriculum, takes a holistic approach in exploring challenging 
and relevant topics for ministry. Taught by CTU faculty and dis- 



67 



academic programs 



'^^>; 



M 




tinguished visiting faculty, it focuses on seven key areas for con- 
temporary ministry: liturgy and preaching, scripture, spirituality, 
moral theology and social concerns, systematics, psychology and 
human development, and ministry issues. The Hesburgh 
Sabbatical includes course work, reflection groups, liturgies, 
and an integrating retreat at a beautiful off-campus setting. The 
lively cultural life of Chicago and superb offerings of the Hyde 
Park theological community enrich each Hesburgh participant's 
experience. 



Whether examin- 
ing spirituality^ 
the bible ^ or per- 
plexing ethical 
questions, CTIJ 
students engage 
in a dynamic 
learning process^ 
guided by a holis- 
tic, integrated 
curriculum. 



Individually-Designed Sabbatical 

The Individually-Designed Sabbatical is a flexible sabbatical for 
experienced ministers who fashion a sabbatical that fulfills their 
goals and needs. Participants choose from a broad spectrum of 
superb resources at CTU including: graduate theology courses, 
Hesburgh Sabbatical offerings, Institute for Sexuality Studies 
courses, Institute of Religious Formation modules, any Biblical 
Study and Travel program, spiritual direction, and films and lec- 



68 



academic programs 



tures at area universities and theological schools. Participants 
may enroll for one or two semesters and take courses for credit 
or audit. 

The Institute of Religious Formation 

Known as "the formation program for a global church," the 
Institute of Religious Formation (IRF) is a multifaceted 9- 
month educational program for the women and men charged 
with formation responsibilities in Roman Catholic religious 
communities and diocesan seminaries. The Institute offers a 
curriculum of relevant and interactive courses taught by CTU 
and visiting faculty in four key areas: formation and the spiri- 
tual life, formation skills, human development and psychology, 
and challenging issues for formation. Participants benefit from 
living, studying, and working with people from across the globe 
and having the extraordinary cultural and ministerial resources 
of Chicago just outside the doors of CTU. The classes and 
workshops provide an exciting spiritual, collaborative, intellec- 
tual, and experiential approach to learning and formation min- 
istry. An optional two-week spring retreat in the Holy Land is 
the culminating experience of the Institute. 

Ministny Study Programs -- 

World Mission Program 

One of the distinctives of CTU is the extraordinary emphasis 
upon and investment in mission. Mission theory and praxis are 
interwoven throughout the CTU educational experience. The 
World Mission concentration, available in the M.Div, M.A., and 
M.A.P.S. degree programs, is directed by the Cross-Cultural 



69 



academic programs 



Ministries department. A wide selection of courses explores the 
missiological dimensions of the theological disciplines while spe- 
cific cross-cultural courses examine cultural dynamics and their 
implications for mission and ministry. Other special courses pre- 
pare students for cross-cultural mission and ministry abroad. 
Those returning from the Overseas Training Program, along with 
returned and furloughed missionaries, participate in mission inte- 
gration seminars to process their experience and re-entry. 

To augment the academic offerings, the World Mission pro- 
gram sponsors the annual Mission Lecture, the student-led 
Mission Focus discussions, and an array of special mission 
events. Students and faculty alike experience the cultural and 
religious pluralism of the global church not only in the class- 
room, but also through liturgies, cultural events, and among the 
rich diversity of international students and those with mission 
and cross-cultural experience. Students are encouraged to reflect 
theologically and pastorally on the contemporary issues of mis- 
sion, particularly through the Integrating Core. 

Cross-Cultural Transformation 

Service in a global church requires acute cross-cultural sensitiv- 
ity. The Cross-Cultural Ministries department offers intensives in 
the January term and during May and June to prepare participants 
for ecumenical, cross-cultural mission and ministry. Assigned 
readings in mission theory, cross-cultural praxis, and literature 
about the mission site, help prepare students for their field 
experience. January participants may visit the Diocese of San 
Cristobal, Chiapas, Mexico, or become involved with sites in 
Chicago, such as the Native American community and agencies 
involved with survivors of human rights abuses. During the May/ 



70 



academic programs 

June intensive students travel to the Rosebud and Pine Ridge 
Native American Reservations in South Dakota. 

Hispanic Ministry 

Nearly one of every two Roman Catholics in the U.S. is 
Hispanic/Latino. Out of an increasing awareness that ordained 
and lay ministers must be prepared for this reality, courses are 
provided in Hispanic Ministry and Pastoral Studies. These 
courses provide both Hispanic and non-Hispanic students with a 
theological education that is historically, culturally, and reli- 
giously grounded in an Hispanic/Latino context and experience. 
CTU cooperates with the Hispanic Ministry programs of 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and McCormick 
Theological Seminary to provide other educational experiences 
such as seminars, workshops, community dialogue, and special 
events. A concentration in Hispanic Pastoral Studies is available 
toM.A.RS. students. , 

Native American Ministries 

Faculty in the Cross-Cultural Ministries department offer traveling 
seminars to the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South 
Dakota in May and June of each year. These seminars are an inte- 
gral part of courses on Native American culture and spirituality. 
It is also possible to arrange special field placements in the 
Native American community in Chicago or on the reservations 
in South Dakota. Individual guidance is available to students 
interested in focusing on Native American studies. 



71 



academic programs 



Spirituality Studies 

A rich variety of options is offered in the area of spirituaHty 
studies. In addition to the courses of the Spirituality and Pastoral 
Ministry department, many other courses include a concern for 
spiritual life and ministry. Sabbatical and continuing education 
students frequently attest that they find the environment of CTU, 
especially its liturgical life, cultural opportunities, community 
atmosphere, and availability of spiritual directors and spiritual 
companions, very conducive for spiritual growth and reflection. 
The nearby Claret Center offers spiritual direction, counseling, 
workshops and retreats, and an internship in spiritual direction. 
For those desiring more structured study in spirituality, the 
M.A. and D.Min. programs offer concentrations in this field. 
Students in M.A.RS. or M.Div. programs may select from spiritu- 
ality courses for electives, ministry practica, and final projects. 
Certificate programs are available in Spiritual Formation and in 
Biblical Spirituality. 

Institute for Liturgical Consultants 

The Institute for Liturgical Consultants is an intensive, two- 
summer program for architects, artists, and liturgists who wish to 
serve as professional facilitators for communities renovating or 
building places of worship. The program can be taken either as 
professional enrichment for practicing consultants or as the first 
step for those preparing to assume this work. Applicants must 
have formal academic preparation and professional experience in 
one of these areas: architecture, art, liturgy, educational process, 
or change management. The Institute initiates a new group every 
third year (2006, 2009). For information contact Rev. Gilbert 
Ostdiek, O.RM. 



72 



academic programs 



Claret Center Internship in Spiritual Direction 

Located in Hyde Park, the Claret Center offers a 9-month intern- 
ship in spiritual direction. The internship meets one day each 
week and can be combined with other course work and/or 
employment. M. Div. students may propose the internship for 
approval as their Immersion Practicum. M.A.P.S. students may 
propose the internship to satisfy the Ministry Practicum require- 
ment and/or Spirituality Area requirement. Interested students 
must apply and be accepted by the Claret Center. For information 
contact the Claret Center or the Spirituality and Pastoral Ministry 
department. 

National Capital SennesterforSenninarians 

Catholic Theological Union participates in the National Capital 
Semester for Seminarians, directed by Wesley Theological 
Seminary in Washington, D.C Students spend a semester focus- 
ing on public policy and theology through study, reflection, direct 
political action, and meet with those involved in the political 
process. For information contact the M.Div. director. 

The Institute for Black Catholic Studies 

Students interested in understanding the African- American com- 
munity or ministering within it can study in the Summer Institute 
for Black Catholic Studies at Xavier University in New Orleans, 
Louisiana. The Institute sponsors the only Catholic program that 
offers the Master of Theology degree (Th.M.) from an 
Afrocentric perspective. In addition to work in the theological 
disciplines, the Institute offers certificates in youth ministry and 
catechetics and courses in lay leadership. Students can transfer 
6 credits earned at the Summer Institute to CTU or complete a 



73 



academic programs 

second master's degree through the Institute. For information 
contact the ToUon Program director. 

Study Abroad Programs /' • ■ :• 

Biblical Study and Travel 

The BibUcal Study and Travel Programs provide an opportunity 
to experience the lands of the Bible in a selection of academi- 
cally-oriented programs. Led by the faculty of the Biblical 
Literature and Languages department, these learning experiences 
both deepen the student's understanding of the Bible and foster 
spiritual growth. In addition to the programs listed, trips are peri- 
odically planned for additional areas significant to biblical and 
church history. For example, faculty have designed and directed 
programs in Egypt, Syria and Lebanon, Greece and Turkey, 
Rome and Ravenna, and Malta and Tunisia. 

Fall Program 

The annual Fall Program is a time of study and exploration of 
biblical and historical sites in Greece, Turkey, Israel, the 
Palestinian Authority, Jordan, and Egypt guided by the faculty. 
This extended program which can be taken for as little as 2 weeks 
or as long as 12, combines focused course work in the Old and 
New Testaments with visits to historical and archaeological sites 
such as Athens, Corinth, Ephesus, Bethlehem, Jerusalem, 
Capernaum, Petra, Luxor, and Cairo. Students can earn up to 12 
graduate credits. 

Israel and Jordan Study Program 

The two-week Israel and Jordan program, offered in odd-num- 
bered years mid- January, is an intensive study tour guided by the 



74 



academic programs 



faculty. On this trip students deepen their knowledge of the Bible 
by visiting a full range of major biblical sites in Israel, the 
Palestinian Authority, and Jordan. Students can earn 3 graduate 
credits for the History and Archaeology of Israel course. 



The Holy Land Retreat 

The annual two-week Holy 
Land Retreat offered in May, 
provides an opportunity to 
reflect prayerfully on the scrip- 
tures while traveling in Israel. A 
portion of each day is spent vis- 
iting biblical sites for reflection 
and prayer. Travel begins near 
the Sea of Galilee, then heads 
south to Jerusalem and the 
many significant sites nearby. 

Overseas Training 
Program 

The Overseas Training Program 
(OTP) is a supervised mission- 
ary-pastoral experience in a 
cross-cultural setting. The pro- 
gram entails at least one year of 
direct ministry with supervision, 
which begins after the necessary lan- 
guage and cultural studies prepara- 
tion. Religious communities with 
students in the Overseas Training 




Fw over 30 years, CTU has led 
study tours of the Holy Land^ 
Middle Emi, and Greece and 
Turkey, exphning thefouMkitiom 
of our Christian andhiblkal 
heritage. Photo: Laurie Brink, O.E 



IS 



academic programs 



Program organize and administer the program for their students 
in consultation with the Cross-Cultural Ministries department. 
Independent students plan their programs in consultation with the 
Cross-Cultural Ministries department. 

Italy Study 

Cities like Rome, Assisi, Florence, and Ravenna have been the 
backdrop for many of the important events and people that have 
shaped our Christian Faith. They have been the canvas on which 
much of western Christian spirituality has been painted. By visit- 
ing these four Italian cities the course takes an interdisciplinary 
approach to studying significant moments and figures pertaining 
to our history and spirituality. Topics include the catacombs and 
martyrdom spirituality, early medieval church images and edi- 
fices, mendicant spirituality as well as early Franciscan visual 
and literary history, the politics and pictorial programs at work in 
Ravenna and the church's role in the Florentine Renaissance. The 
aim of the course is to familiarize students with the role that art 
and architecture have had in promoting the Christian faith. 

Louvain Study 

Students may spend one or two semesters studying in the 
English-speaking section of the theological faculty of the 
Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium). Details are available 
from the Academic Dean. 

Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies ' 

Sponsored in cooperation with Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural 
Studies in northern Ghana, students can participate in a 9-week 
summer program or a 3 -week immersion program in Ghana, West 



76 



academic programs 



Africa. Scheduled from mid- June to mid- August annually, the 
summer program includes cultural orientation, intensive language 
study, village immersion, and debriefing. The immersion (late 
August to mid-September), includes the four components in 
shorter duration. For information contact the Cross-Cultural 
Ministries department (summer program) or the Chicago Center 
for Global Ministries (immersion program). 



77 



course offerings 








Ourfacuity is a brain trust 
of world-re ft own ed 
Catholic, Jewish^ and 
Protestmit scholars whose 
wrifmg and teaching are 
at the forefront of today ^s 
religious ami theological 
issues. Photo: Da/siei OToHfU'll 



78 



course offerings 



The courses in this catalog are designed to provide a comprehensive, integrative 
theological education for ministry in an increasingly global world and a solid 
foundation for effectiveness as a minister in the Catholic Church. While these 
courses represent those taught at Catholic Theological Union, courses offered at a 
given point in time may vary. 

Course Codes 

The system of letters and numbers that identify courses indicate their characteris- 
tics. 

Letters 

The letter(s) that precede the numbers usually indicate the field(s) of study. A 
course with multiple letters satisfies the requirements of each designated field. 
For example, BW satisfies the requirements for Biblical Studies or Word and 
Worship. An exception occurs in the letters for the Foundational Core components 
of the curriculum. 

Fields of Study: 

B Biblical Studies M Ministerial Studies 

C Cross-Cultural Studies MP Ministry related to Pastoral Ministry 

D Doctrinal Studies MW Ministry related to Word and Worship 

E Ethical Studies P Philosophy Prerequisites 

H Historical Studies S Spirituality Studies 

I Interdisciplinary/Integrative W Word and Worship Studies 

Note: Biblical Study and Travel courses have an i after the 4-digit number 



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course offerings 



Numbers 

The four digit numbers indicate the level of instruction of the course. 

2000 Non-credit prerequisite level course 

4000 Intermediate level courses 

5000 Seminar level courses 

6000 Doctor of Ministry seminars 



Core letters 
Complementary Core 
Course co&q^ follow course titles: 
CC-P Complementary/Pastoral 

Practice 
CC-A Complementary/ Art of 
Theology 
FR Foundational/Religion in Context CC-R Complementary/Religion in 

Context 
FT Foundational/Tradition CC-T Complementary/Tradition 



Foundational and Complementary 
Foundational Core 
Course codQ^ precede course titles: 
FP Foundational/Pastoral Practice 

FA Foundational/ Art of Theology 



Core Curriculunn Courses 



FOUNDATIONAL CORE 

(Courses are team taught) 

FP 4000 Pastoral Practice: The Theology of Ministry 

An introduction to critical thinking about ministry as a theological act in order to become 
more effective in ministry Study the history of ministry, reflect theologically on ministe- 
rial practice, and focus on several issues in that practice, (i.e., the contextual naUire of 
ministry, ministry and power, and ministry and embodiment.) A theological reflection 
method for ministry is introduced and practiced. 



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course offerings 



FA 4000 Art of Doing Theology: Theological Methods 

This interdisciplinary course acquaints students with various methods of theological 

analysis and is designed to be both experiential and theoretical. 

FR 4000 Religion in Context: Diversity in Dialogue 

Gain an understanding of spirituality, religious experiences, and religion in cultural con- 
text. Become open to various authentic experiences of God, and acquire a deeper under- 
standing of the evangelizing/missionary nature of the church. 

FT 4000 Tradition: Sources through History 

An introduction to the nature, breadth, and diversity of the church's tradition within the 
framework of the history of the world Christian movement, from ancient to modern times. 
Topics include: documents, movements, eras, rituals, artifacts, and persons. 



COMPLEMENTARY CORE COURSES 

(Thematic areas: Pastoral Practice, the Art of Theology, Religion in Context, and 
Tradition) 

B 4001 Introduction to the Bible (CC-T) 

An introduction to the text and various parts and genres of the Old and New Testaments, 

the issues arising from these, and relevant interpretive approaches. 

C 4001 Crossing Cultural Boundaries: Ministn/ at the Margins (CC-R) 
Who are we, what are we doing, and why? Everyone has a particular social location, 
assumptions, and expectations which they bring to ministry. Examine culture, religion, 
faith, encounter — and the call to conversion — as constitutive of marginal and boundary- 
breaking ministry. , ' 

D4001 Doing Systematic Theology (CC-A) 

Investigate the nature and methods of systematic theology. After defining theology 
according to Anselm of Canterbury's classic "faith seeking understanding," draw implica- 
tions for doing systematic theology in today's context (Part I), and explore how systematic 
theology is done as a communal, ecclesial enterprise in conversation with Christian tradi- 
tion and the church's teaching office (Part II). Then investigate the various sources of pos- 
itive theology, survey the methods of speculative theological reflection, and examine 
various theological texts (e.g., patristic, scholastic, neo-orthodox, or liberation theology) 
in terms of the methods employed. 



course offerings 



C 4002 Abraham's Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims (CC-R) 

A cross-cultural and comparative introduction to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam using 

historical, theological, and ethnographic methodologies. 

E 4001 Living the Moral Life (CC-A) 

An introduction to the basic themes of the Christian moral life including its personal, 
social, and cosmic dimensions. Using classical texts and contemporary case studies, 
focus on the particular sources, authorities, and methods of the Roman Catholic ethical 
tradition. Attention given to the relationship between methods of systematic theology and 
ethical methods. 

S 4001 Spiritual Companioning for Ministry (CC-P) 

This course provides foundational understanding and experience of being with others 
within a spiritual companioning context. Focus on the art and ministry of spiritual 
companioning and the practical applications in diverse ministerial settings. Issues such as 
listening skills, reverence of individual differences, and discernment are explored. The 
course design includes input, discussion, and practicum. 

W4001 Communication Skills for Ministry (CC-P) 

Examine the nature and dynamics of the human communication process as it applies to 
1) oral interpretation of written texts; 2) rhetorical design and public discourse; 3) the use 
of mass media; 4) interpersonal communication; and 5) non-verbal and ritual expressions. 
Attention is given to the cross-cultural and ministerial dimensions of these forms of com- 
munication. 

W4110 Holy Week: Liturgy Preaching and Presiding (CC-P) 
Examine in an integrated fashion the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, specifically 
Passion Sunday and the Triduum. Included are the historical and theological study of Holy 
Week; celebration of and mystagogical reflection on the current rites; issues in preparing, 
preaching, and presiding during Holy Week and Triduum; the interplay of liturgical cele- 
bration and popular religiosity; and reflection on liturgical spirituality fostered through 
and from the rites. 

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post- western, the church in Asia has an increasingly significant 
role in the church of the future. This introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian 
church begins by looking at the context of Asia, then exploring how theology addresses 
the realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 



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course offerings 



INTEGRATING CORE 

(Courses are interdisciplinary) 

CD 4100 Inculturation and Dialogue: Ministry Across Boundaries 
Building upon and integrating previous studies and experiences, this course enables 
students to attend more closely to the contexts in which they minister, particularly when 
the cultural/social contexts and the ideological or faith convictions they encounter are not 
their own. 

DB4100 Witness and Prodannation: The God of Jesus Christ 

Reflect on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom Christians witness in mission 
and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human experience through 
the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and cross of 
Jesus of Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral practice, 
method, particular contexts of cultures and religions, and the Christian tradition. 

BMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the integrity of Creation and Reconciliation: Living the 
Values of the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian 
ministry with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologi- 
cally threatened and violent world. The disciplines of social ethics and pastoral ministry 
are emphasized. ' 

WS4100 Liturgy Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality 
This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the resuk of apostolic action. Includes reading, 
discussion, lecture, and practical exercises. 



83 



course offerings 

Area Requirements 

CROSS-CULTURAL MINISTRIES 

Any 4000 level "C" course 

DOCTRINE 

D 4200 Christology 

A systematic treatment of the foundations of Christology in a post-critical context this 
course is concerned with the possibility of constructing and evaluating Christology after 
one has subjected the Bible to the analysis of historical-critical studies, and after one has 
become thoroughly aware of the profound historicity of the Christian faith-community 
and its doctrines. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith 
today. Special emphasis given to emerging christologies in the World Church, construct- 
ing christologies today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 

D 4201 Ecclesiology 

This course consists of an historical and systematic study of the understanding of the 
church in the Christian tradition and in contemporary thought. Special attention is given 
to ecclesiological themes and issues which are critical for life in the church today. 

HISTORY 

Any 4000 level "H" course ., 

ETHICS 

Any 4000 level "E" course 



PASTORAL MINISTRY 

MP 4306 Pastoral Ministry: Developing Skills and Connpetencies for Cooperative 
Leadership 

Explore ministry as an experience of accompaniment with shared responsibilities and 
accountabilities. Attention is given to means and resources for cultivating effective leader- 
ship styles, developing pastoral plans and strategies, creating and sustaining networks, and 
addressing conflict and boundary situations. 



84 



course offerings 



SPIRITUALITY 

Any 4000 level "S" course 



WORD AND WORSHIP 

\NA200 Sacraments I: Initiation & Reconciliation 

Theological, historical, and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of 
initiation and reconciliation. Particular attention given to: the RCIA as norm for initiatory 
practice; the relation of sacramental reconciliation to the church's life; and foundations of 
practical skills for celebration. 

W 4201 Sacraments II: Eucharist and Sacramental Theology 

This course serves as a general introduction to sacramental theology, and as a particular 

introduction to the Eucharist, its history, theology, structure, and practice. 

W 4202 Presiding Practicum 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of 
sacramental rites, including initiation, weddings, anointing, wakes, and funerals. Special 
emphasis given to Eucharist and Reconciliation. Prerequisite: Sacraments I and II 

W 4203 Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. 

Participants consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural, and practical dynamics of preaching. 

W 4204 Canon Law 

An introductory course addressing the nature, role, and history of canon law; church 

structures and ministries; and law regulating sacramental practice. 

W 4205 Lay Leadership of Prayer and Preaching 

A practicum to develop competency in the leadership of the community's prayer, includ- 
ing Hours, catechumenal rites, the funeral Vigil, penitential liturgies, liturgies of Word and 
Communion, and ministry to the sick and dying. In conjunction with these settings, it also 
considers the liturgical, canonical, and pastoral dynamics and practical skills of lay 
preaching in catechesis and worship. Prerequisite: Sacraments I or II 



85 



course offerings 



DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE (BLL) 
Dianne Bergant, C.S.A., Barbara Bowe, R.S.C.J., Laurie Brink, O.P., Thanh Van Nguyen, 
S.V D., James Okoye, C.S.Sp., Barbara Reid, O.P., Rabbi David Sandmel, Donald Senior, C.P. 

Note: An "i " after the course number indicates the course is taught in Jerusalem as part 
of the Fall Biblical Study and Travel Program. 

B 4001 Introduction to the Bible (CC-T) 

An introduction to the text and various parts and genres of the Old and New Testaments, 

this course examines the issues arising from these and investigates relevant interpretive 

approaches. 

DB4100 Witness and Proclannation: The God of Jesus Christ 
Reflect on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom Christians witness in mission 
and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human experience through 
the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and cross of 
Jesus of Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral practice, 
method, particular contexts of cultures and religions, and the Christian tradition. 

B 4300 Hebrew 

This course is an intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical 

Hebrew that prepares students to translate passages of the Old Testament. 

B 4301 Old Testament Narrative Literature 

An examination of the major narrative sections of the Old Testament, attention is given to 
the formation of the material — the historical value, the theological importance to ancient 
Israel, and the role it might play in contemporary life and ministry. 

6 4302 Religious and Social Protest of Amos 

After a general introduction to prophetic literature and to the composition and themes of 
the Book of Amos, study sections that portray the social and religious protest of Amos 
more closely. A literary and theological approach. 

B4310 Old Testament Prophets 

This study of selected texts from the latter prophets focuses on the development of the 

Isaianic tradition and the value of the book of Isaiah for Christian theology and preaching. 



86 



course offerings 



B4311 The Former Prophets 

A study of selected texts from Joshua to 2 Kings, focusing on the contrast between histori- 
cal Israel and biblical Israel in order to appreciate the theological dimension of ancient 
Israel's story. 

B 4312 Second Temple Judaism and Early Rabbinic Judaism 
The first part of the course focuses on an examination of the variety of expressions of 
Judaism in the Second Temple period. The second part focuses on the emergence of 
Rabbinic Judaism in the wake of the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. 

8 431 3 Old Testament Poetry 

An investigation of selections from the psalms and the wisdom tradition of the Old 
Testament, this course concentrates on careful reading of the text, the various theological 
concerns found therein, and the importance of this material for ministerial practice. 

B 43161 Biblical History and Archaeology: Old Testament 

A study of nonliterary sources for reconstructing ancient Israel's history, this study of the 
principles of archaeology is complemented with visits to archaeological sites and muse- 
ums in Israel, Greece, Turkey, Jordan, and Egypt. 

B 4400 Biblical Greek 

This intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Greek pre- 
pares students to translate passages of the New Testament and early Christian literature. 

B 4402 The Gospel According to Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theo- 
logical world, this course helps integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, 
spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

BC 4403 Mark in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

A study of the narrative of Mark from a cultural and theological perspective this course 
focuses on Markan style and theology in dialogue with the Jewish background and with 
the contexts and questions of today. 

B 4404 History and Archaeology of Israel 

The course is a study of the principles of archaeology and an inquiry into some of the 

nonliterary sources for understanding the ancient societies of the Levant. 



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course offerings 



B 4405 The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the Gospel of Matthew with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and 
theological world, students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, 
spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

B 4406 The Gospel According to Luke 

This study of the Gospel of Luke gives attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and 
theological world and helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with 
theology, spirituality and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

6 4407 The Gospel According to John 

This study of the Gospel of John focuses on its historical, literary, cultural, and theologi- 
cal world, and helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, 
spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

BC 4407 Luke as Story in Asian Context 

Critically examine the Gospel of Luke as a narrative through literary analysis of its story 
and discourse, form and content, rhetorical techniques and theology. For contemporary 
readers who are Asians or interested in an Asian context. 

B4408 Acts of the Apostles 

A study of the missionary expansion of early Christianity as depicted in Acts of the 
Apostles this course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with 
theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

B 4409 Revelation and Letters of John 

Thematic and exegetical study of the book of Revelation (Apocalypse) and the letters of 
John from the perspectives of history, culture, understanding of church, apocalyptic and 
epistolary genres, and contemporary interpretation. 

B4410 Christian Origins and the Pauline Mission 

The missionary activity of Paul and his apostolic team is explored through his letters, 
Greco-Roman and Jewish literature, and archaeology tracing the development of the 
Christian religion as it encountered new cultures and adapted to its social environment. 

B 441 1 Paul: The Corinthian Correspondence , - 

This study of 1-2 Corinthians gives attention to the historical, literary, cultural, and 
theological world of that time, and examines the relevance of Paul's pastoral approaches 
for a contemporary multicultural church. 



course offerings 



B 4412 Paul: Galatians and Romans 

This course is a study of Paul's life and world with attention to the letters to the Galatians 

and Romans in their historical, literary, cultural, and theological context. The relevance of 

Paul's theological and pastoral approaches to the contemporary multicultural church is 

addressed. 

B 44 1 5/ Jesus in Historical Context 

A study of selected texts from the Gospels related to biblical sites visited in the Holy 
Land, emphasis is given to understanding Jesus within the context of first century 
Palestinian Judaism and the social context of first century Galilee and Jerusalem. 

6 44 1 6i Biblical History and Archaeology: New Testament 

This course is an introduction to methods of biblical archaeology for interpreting material 
remains of early Christianity. Classroom study is complemented with visits to archaeolog- 
ical sites. 

B 44171 The Holy City (Israel) 

This course examines the city of Jerusalem in the literature of ancient Israel and early 

Judaism. > 

B 4501 Gospel Parables 

Study the dynamics of the parables in the Synoptic Gospels as stories that challenge the 
hearer to conversion. Attention is given to historical, literary, cultural, and theological per- 
spectives and to insights for preaching and teaching parabolically. 

BC 4502 Reading the Bible Differently: African-American Biblical Perspectives 
Different contexts and perspectives lead to different approaches to and interpretations of 
the Bible. Study the interplay between the African- American contexts and the resulting 
appropriation and interpretation of the Bible. Participants are inducted into the wider issue 
of social location in biblical hermeneutics. 

BC 4503 Perspectives in African Biblical Interpretation 

After an introduction into the African culture and context, the approaches, themes, and 
texts in current African biblical interpretation are studied. Participants are introduced to 
the question of text and context in interpretation. 

6 4504 Jesus Through Jewish Eyes 

This course examines the different ways that Jews have related to the figure of Jesus 
during his life (to the extent that can be determined) and throughout the history of 
Christianity. Also demonstrated is the manner in which, at any given time, these attitudes 
are related to the state of Jewish-Christian relations. 

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course offerings 



BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to 
establish the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to bibli- 
cal images for God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for 
justice and peace in the biblical world and in our own. 

6 4527 Integrating Seminar: Biblical Spirituality Program 

This seminar integrates experience in the Biblical Study and Travel program and CTU 

course work, ministerial background and personal ideals, and contemporary questions for 

a holistic biblical spirituality. Restricted to participants of the Biblical Study and Travel 

program. 

BC 5001 The Servant of the Lord and Interpretation 

This extensive introduction to the text and themes of Deutero-Isaiah is followed by the 
study of the sayings about the Servant of the Lord in relation to their meaning for the 
vocation of Israel and of people called to be God's servants. Reapplications of the servant 
theme in the New Testament are considered to the extent possible. 

BC 5002 Women in the Scripture 

This advanced seminar in feminist approaches to the scripture, examines texts from the 

canonical as well as some non-canonical literature. 

6 5005 Messianic Expectation in Early Judaism 

This course is a seminar on messianism as it developed in ancient Israel and early Judaism 

in light of the Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah. 

BC 5010 Bible, Mission, and Culture 

This is an examination of the grounds for, and models of, mission in the Bible and of 
some issues in mission and culture. In even years the course is limited to the Old 
Testament; in odd years the entire Bible is considered. 

BC5012 Latina Perspectives on Biblical Interpretation 

This seminar on the work of women theologians in the U.S.A. and in Latin America 
focuses attention on Latina feminist/muj crista methods for interpreting scripture and 
insights for preaching and teaching from scripture in a multicultural church. 

B5120 Seminar: Church in the New Testament 

Explore the different perceptions and images of the church in the New Testament canon. 
Structures of communal organization, worship, and ministry, as well as the diversity in 
both theology and praxis are investigated. 



90 



course offerings 



6 5201 Gospel of John from the Greek 

This course is a careful exegesis of the Greek text of the gospel that stresses John's unique 
language, literary style, and theology Students also explore the social-historical context 
of the Johannine community. 

6 5305 Passion Narratives 

Study the four Gospel Passion and Resurrection accounts, using a variety of approaches to 
biblical interpretation. Attention is given to how the various interpretations of the violent 
death of Jesus can help stop cycles of violence in contemporary contexts. 

B 5400 Intertestamental Literature 

This seminar focuses on non-canonical Jewish literature produced from 200 B.C. to A.D. 
200. Emphasis is on the impact of these writings on the theology of early Christianity and 
rabbinic Judaism. 

B 5423 Jewish-Christian Relations 

The course covers the history and current state of Christian/Jewish Relations and focuses 

on recent documents issued by both religious bodies. 

BW5500 Biblical Hermeneutics for Preaching 

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to a process of integrating contempla- 
tion, biblical and theological study, and pastoral praxis for a ministry of preaching. 

BD5510 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

This team-taught seminar investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes such as God, 
Christ, Trinity, creation, theological anthropology, sin and evil, Mary, church, and ministry 
from a feminist perspective. 

B 551 1 Fundamentalist Biblical Interpretation 

This seminar focuses on the origins of fundamentalism and its approach to biblical inter- 
pretation with an attempt to formulate a pastoral response to the theological stance and 
proselytizing efforts of fundamentaHsts. 

B5512 Biblical Methods 

This seminar investigates several methods currently used to interpret biblical texts. 
These methods, with their underlying presuppositions and interpretive possibilities, 
are employed in the examination of various texts and evaluated for their effectiveness in 
opening up the meaning of scripture. 



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course offerings 



BC5515 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

This team taught course examines themes that recur in cuhures and in the First Testament 
in order to see how anthropology and biblical studies can enlighten each other as well as 
the missionary/theological enterprise. 

S 6007 The Bible and Contemporary Issues 

The course is designed for those interested in various aspects of biblical ministry. It 
addresses contemporary issues such as: integrity of creation; gender, racial, and economic 
justice; violence and war. It examines the ministries of preaching, teaching, pastoral min- 
istry, and spirituality formation. 



DEPARTMENT OF CROSS-CULTURAL MINISTRIES (CCM) 

Scott Alexander, Michel Andraos, Rev Claude-Marie Barbour, Eleanor Doidge, L.o.B., 
Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp., Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.VD., Roger Schroeder, S.VD. 

C 4001 Crossing Cultural Boundaries: Ministry at the Margins (CC-R) 
Who are we, what are we doing, and why? Everyone has a particular social location, 
assumptions, and expectations, which they bring to ministry. Examine culture, religion, 
faith, encounter-and the call to conversion-as constitutive of marginal and boundary- 
breaking ministry. 

C 4002 Abraham's Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims (CC-R) 

This cross-cultural and comparative introduction to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam uses 

historical, theological, and ethnographic methodologies. 

CD 4100 Inculturation and Dialogue: Ministry Across Boundaries 
Building upon and integrating previous studies and experiences, this course enables students 
to attend more closely to the contexts in which they minister, particularly when the cultural/ 
social contexts and the ideological or faith convictions encountered are not their own. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

Investigate the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. 
Special emphasis is given to emerging christologies in the world church, constructing 
christologies today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 

MFC 4300 Pastoral Challenges of Cultural Diversity 

Cultural diversity is a growing phenomenon in the new global context. By engaging 
participants in an intercultural learning process, this course prepares pastoral leaders to 
deal with challenges of cultural diversity in their communities. 



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CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Tiieology for Today 
This course weaves together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global 
history of the world Christian movement. In this process it traces the patterns by which 
fundamental theological constants or questions are addressed in varying changing 
contexts and how relevant mission theologies are developed. 

CW4301 Initiation and Contextualization 

After studying the general characteristics of Christian initiation and other types of initiation 
as cultural-religious phenomena throughout human history, the seminar focuses on the 
theological, cultural, liturgical, and pastoral issues in the holistic process of contextualizing 
initiation in particular Christian contexts. 

CH 4302 Earliest Christian Traditions in Asia 

This course is an investigation of earliest Christian contacts with Asian cultures and 
traditions along the "silk" routes (land and sea), beginning with the apostle Thomas to 
1 500 C.E. It distinguishes facts, legends, and hypotheses as a framework for assessing 
such contacts. 

CH 4303 Christianity in Asia: Sixteenth to Twentieth Centuries 
This course explores Christian encounters with Asian cultures and traditions during the 
period under consideration, with particular focus on operative theologies of mission. 
Participants gain a general understanding of the field and are expected to research one 
specific Asian area of interest. 

MPC 4308 Pastoral Care in an African-American Context 

Explore the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of an 

African- American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African- American 

experience and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. 

Students develop a better understanding/ability to minister in the African- American 

community. 

C4310 Mission Integration 

This integrating seminar is for those returning from cross-cultural and/or overseas training 

placements (OTP) of mission/ministry and provides a process for deeper understanding of 

the experience through theological reflection and integration of the past, present, and 

future. 



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CH4310 History of the World Christian Movement in the Nineteenth and 
Twentieth Centuries 

The end of the French Revolution marked the beginning of a period during which 
Christianity eventually developed into a vibrant world movement. This course examines 
historical-theological models of mission and related contemporary issues within varied 
social-political, religious, and ecclesial contexts. 

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post- western, the church in Asia has an increasingly significant 
role in the church of the future. This introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian 
church begins by looking at the context of Asia, then exploring how theology addresses 
the realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 

C 4320 Islam 

This introduction to the faith tradition of nearly one-fifth of humanity includes: the life of 
Muhammad(s.); Qur'an and hadith; the five "pillars" of Muslim praxis; Islamic law and 
theology; Sunni/ShiMte sectarianism; mysticism; and contemporary Muslim renewal and 
reform movements. 

C 4321 The Qur'an 

This course explores the role that the Qur'an plays in Muslim consciousness by focusing 
on such topics as: the function of the text in Muslim piety; biblical-Quranic intertextual- 
ity; Quranic commentary and exegesis; and the Qur'an as oral/aural scripture. 

C 4325 Introduction to Judaism 

Designed to introduce the most important aspects of Jewish practice and belief, particu- 
larly stresses questions and problems relevant to contemporary Jews, while setting them 
within a historical context. Considers issues in the relationship between Judaism and 
Christianity, including the dialogue that has developed in recent decades. 

CD 4326 Developments in Mission Theology 

Mission theologies are formal accounts of different missionary strategies and tactics over 
time and space, which are varied and changing. Survey selected approaches (classical and 
contemporary world), identifying strengths, weaknesses, assumptions, implications, and 
applications to individual ministry. 

C 4330 Interreligious Dialogue 

Investigate forms of dialogue with other religions developed in Catholic Christianity since 
Vatican II. Attention is given to the dialogue of religious experience and a comparative 
theology arising from the practice of dialogue. Field trips and various media formats. 



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C£ 4400 Mission and Peacemaking 

Systemic violence (social, cultural, economic, political, and ecological) is globally 

widespread. Drawing on Catholic social teaching, theology of peace, and some contextual 

pastoral experiences, develop a theological and pastoral vision for the praxis of social 

peacemaking. 

BC 4403 Mar/c in Cross-Cuitural Perspective 

A study of the narrative of Mark from a cultural and theological perspective. Focus is on 
Markan style and theology in dialogue with the Jewish background and with the contexts 
and questions of today. 

BC 4407 Lu/ce as Story in Asian Context 

Critically examine the Gospel of Luke as a narrative through literary analysis of its story 
and discourse, form and content, rhetorical techniques and theology. For contemporary 
readers who are Asians or interested in an Asian context. 

CD 4430 Doing Theology in tine Context of Migrations 

This course is dedicated to the elaboration of a theology that deals with the reality of 
migrations particularly in the U.S. Students are exposed to the complexity of this phenom- 
enon through the analysis of theories that explore the reasons why people migrate and the 
historical, political, legal, cultural, and social dynamics of international migration in the 
U.S. Issues of ethnicity, race, and gender are emphasized. Particular attention is given to 
the human and religious experience of the migrants and students critically relate the real- 
ity of migration with the Christian revelation and traditions. Examine the experience of 
migration as depicted by the Bible, church documents, and theologies on the contempo- 
rary and diverse experience of migrants within the U.S. 

BC 4502 Reading the Bible Differently: African-American Biblical Perspectives 
Different contexts and perspectives lead to different approaches to and interpretation of 
the Bible. Study the interplay between the African- American contexts and the resulting 
appropriation and interpretation of the Bible. Participants are inducted into the wider issue 
of social location in biblical hermeneutics. 

BC 4503 Perspectives in African Biblical Interpretation 

After an introduction into the African culture and context, study the approaches, themes, 
and texts in current African biblical interpretation. Participants are introduced to the 
question of text and context in interpretation. 



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C 4700 Praxis for Cross-Cultural Transformation 

This J-term Intensive course (inspired by Paulo Freire's methodology) prepares students 
for ecumenical, cross-cultural mission/ministry, and consists of preparation, field experi- 
ence, and integration. Field experience: January (Chiapas or Chicago), May/June (Lakota 
Reservations). Additional costs involved depending on location. 

BC 5001 The Servant of the Lord and Interpretation 

This extensive introduction to the text and themes of Deutero-Isaiah is followed by the 
study of the sayings about the Servant of the Lord in relation to their meaning for the 
vocation of Israel and of people called to be God's servants. Reapplications of the servant 
theme in the New Testament are considered to the extent possible. 

DCH 5001 Catholicism, U.S. Culture, and the Mission of the Church 
Investigate the histoiy of Catholicism in the United States, how it has interfaced with U.S. 
culture, and what implications this has for the missionary nature of the church in the US. context. 

BC 5002 Women in the Scripture 

This advanced seminar in feminist approaches to the scripture, examines texts from the 

canonical as well as some non-canonical literature. 

BC5010 Bible, Mission, and Culture 

This is an examination of the grounds for, and models of, mission in the Bible, and 
of some issues in mission and culture. In even years the course is limited to the Old 
Testament; in odd years the entire Bible is considered. 

CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse 
The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses, and violence in our world challenges 
the missionary/minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to 
develop a spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. 
Not open to audit. 

BC 5012 Latina Perspectives on Biblical Interpretation 

This seminar on the work of women theologians in the U.S. and in Latin America, focuses 
attention on Latina feminist/muj crista methods for interpreting scripture and insights for 
preaching and teaching from scripture in a multicultural church. 

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today 

Explore discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing lives 
and in a changing world. First we are called, then sent. The initiative and the agenda are 
not our own. Ponder the implications and applications. 



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SC 5020 Hispanic Spirituality: History and Religiosity 

Focuses on the foundations, beliefs, and challenges of Hispanic/Latino spirituality. The 

course covers topics like: Mesoamerican and medieval Spanish religiosity; what Latinos 

believe about God, Mary, humanity, evil, etc.; and finally, the challenge of evangelizing 

popular religiosity and of enhancing Latino interest in the Word of God, justice, and 

liberation. 

CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue 

In dialogue with Lakota Native Americans who practice traditional spirituality and/or 
Christian faith, this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/min- 
istry. Includes a week-long field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in 
South Dakota. 

SC 5040 Islamic Mysticisnn and Spirituality 

This is an exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purifica- 
tion known as "Sufism." Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobri- 
ety and ecstasy; the stages and states of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and 
classical Sufi poetry. 

C 5041 Contemporary Islamic Renewal and Reform Movements 

A thoughtful perspective on what is popularly called Islamic "fundamentalism," this 

course examines the phenomenon as a response to the effects of Western modernity and 

modernism. It also explores the spectrum of movements ranging from progressive to 

extremist. 

CH 5052 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations 

Investigate Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century Common Era to the 
present. Specific topics include: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades, the fall of 
Constantinople, the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, and contemporary 
Nigeria, Indonesia, and the U.S. 

MFC 5101 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Asian and Pacific Island Contexts 
Asian and Pacific Island populations are a growing presence within the U.S. Catholic 
church. This course explores the history, experiences, and diversity of these communities 
and the implications for pastoral ministry. - 

MPC5102 Pastoral Ministry: Responding to Diversity in Community 
Increasingly, diversity in communities is accompanied by specific and at times, competing 
needs. This course explores theological frameworks and the pastoral means and resources 
for addressingjssues of access with respect towards promoting increased participation in 



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communal life and worship. Issues addressed include but are not limited to language, 
space, resources, leadership, marginality, and communities in transition. 

MFC 5103 Pastoral Ministfy in U.S. Hispanic/Latino/a Contexts 
Demographics indicate that Latinos/as currently constitute the largest and fastest growing 
population in the U.S. Catholic church. This course explores the history, experiences, and 
diversity of this community and the implications for pastoral ministry. 

WC 5200 Advanced Preaching 

This practicum addresses specific pastoral and cultural contexts for preaching, e.g. 

preaching specific sacramental rites (weddings and funerals), preaching various aspects of 

the church year (a cycle of the lectionary or particular feasts and seasons), or preaching in 

distinctive cultural contexts (Hispanic or Asian). Prerequisite: Liturgical Preaching, 

W 4204 

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation 

This seminar explores the inculturation of the church's worship in both historical and con- 
temporary perspectives. Emphasis is placed on current methodological, theological, and 
practical issues raised by the engagement of the church with contemporary cultures. 

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Comnnunity 

This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities com- 
prised of people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It investigates the dynam- 
ics of intercultural engagement; assumptions and principles relating to multiculturalism, 
liturgy, and popular religiosity; conceptual and practical groundwork; and models for 
liturgy that embrace the plurality of cultures in a respectful, inclusive way. 

WC 5208 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

This team taught is an anthropological-liturgical study of the Eucharist to uncover possi- 
ble universals for relating Western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience 
of other cultures and to sketch issues and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. 
Prerequisite: Sacraments II, W420 1 . 

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia 

Explore the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue including the influence of per- 
sonal, social, and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, 
investigate the texts of Christian scriptures and teachings to discern the church's theology 
of religions. 



98 



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DC 5311 Readings in Asian Theology 

This is a reading course on the writings of key Christian theologians — especially on how 

they address the issues arising from the context and realities of Asia. Among the major 

themes examined from an Asian perspective are post-colonialism, contextualization, 

hermeneutics, theological methods, inculturation, integral liberation, and interreligious 

dialogue. 

BC5515 Forms and Meanings in Bible and Culture 

This team taught course examines themes that recur in cultures and in the First Testament 
in order to see how anthropology and biblical studies can enlighten each other as well as 
the missionary/theological enterprise. 

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology in intercultural Perspective 
This doctoral seminar focuses on emerging issues in theological anthropology in the 
world church today, as well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the 
human being. Emphasis is placed on the different contexts in which these issues and 
challenges are encountered. 

CD 6001 Inculturation 

Much misunderstood, inculturation is carefully explicated, theoretically and practically 
and study methods by which Christianity and a culture may actually encounter each other 
are offered. The outcome (with the Spirit and local people) is a new reality: the people of 
God transformed. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES (HDS) 
Stephen Bevans, S.V.D., Edmund Chia, Archie Fornasari, M.C.C.J., Zachary Hayes, 
O.RM., Thomas Nairn, O.EM., Dawn Nothwehr, O.S.E, John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 
Amanda Quantz, Robin Ryan, C.P., Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S. 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

H 4001 Patristics 

Study the theological perspectives of major writers of the early church. 

H 4002 The Middle Ages and the Refornnation ' 

Study from Gregory the Great (600A.D.) to the Council of Trent (1545-1563), focusing 
on the development of the medieval church, relations between east and west, history of 
theology, breakdown of the medieval synthesis, and the significance of major reformers. 



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H 4003 From Trent to Vatican II 

Explore key issues in Catholicism of the last four centuries: the mentality following the 
Reformation, Jansenism, Newman and the Oxford movement, forces influencing Vatican 
I, Modernism and its reaction, pertinent problems of the twentieth century 

H 4300 Byzantine Influences through Church History 

Take an intellectual journey through the lands of eastern Christianity. Examine church 
history through the Byzantine influences that shaped the church from the sixth through 
fifteenth centuries. Topics include key cities and holy sites such as Edessa, 
Constantinople, Ravenna, Mount Athos, and Hagia Sofia. 

CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Theology for Today 
This course weaves together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global 
history of the world Christian movement. In this process it traces the patterns by which 
fundamental theological constants or questions are addressed in varying changing 
contexts and how relevant mission theologies are developed. 

CH 4302 Earliest Christian Traditions in Asia 

This course is an investigation of earliest Christian contacts with Asian cultures and tradi- 
tions along the "silk" routes (land and sea), beginning with the apostle Thomas to 1500 
C.E. It distinguishes facts, legends, and hypotheses as a framework for assessing such 
contacts. 

CH 4303 Christianity in Asia: Sixteenth to Twentieth Centuries 
This course explores Christian encounters with Asian cultures and traditions during the 
period under consideration, with particular focus on operative theologies of mission. 
Students gain a general understanding of the field and are expected to research one 
specific Asian area of interest. 

H4310 The Divine Comedy and the World of Dante 

Vernacular languages launched a revolution in medieval literature. This interdisciplinary 
course examines historical factors at work in and around Dante's Divine Comedy, espe- 
cially the medieval sacral worldview and the theological tenets that characterize the high 
Middle Ages. 

CH4310 History of the World Christian Movement in the Nineteenth and 
Twentieth Centuries 

The end of the French Revolution marked the beginning of a period during which 
Christianity eventually developed into a vibrant world movement. This course examines 



100 



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historical-theological models of mission and related contemporary issues within varied 
social-political, religious, and ecclesial contexts. 

SH 4340 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Movement 
Study the historical development of the Franciscan Family begun by Francis and Clare of 
Assisi and their perspective on Gospel living. It considers the spirituality that has inspired 
reformations within the family and moved the brothers and sisters into ministry, taking 
into account the three Orders begun by Francis as well as the contemporary so-called 
"fourth Order." 

DCH 5001 Catholicism, U.S. Culture, and the Mission of the Church 

Investigate the history of Catholicism in the United States, how it has interfaced with U.S. 

culture, and what imphcations this has for the missionary nature of the church in the U.S. 

context. 

SH 5001 Christian History and Spirituality through Art and Architecture in Italy 
A handful of significant cities have been the backdrop for many of the important events 
and people that have shaped our Christian faith. This interdisciplinary course studies sig- 
nificant moments and figures pertaining to our history and spirituality. This two-week 
team-taught course takes place every other summer in the Italian cities of Rome, Assisi, 
Florence, and Ravenna. Topics include the catacombs and martyrdom spirituality, early 
medieval church images and edifices, mendicant spirituality as well as early Franciscan 
visual and literary history, the politics and pictorial programs at work in Ravenna, and the 
church's role in the Florentine Renaissance. Students learn on site about the role of art and 
architecture in promoting the Christian faith. 

H 5050 Local Church History: An Interdisciplinary Method for Narrative Scholarship 
Learn a holistic method for studying history through the richness and diversity of local 
churches across time, throughout the world. This course examines the varieties of interre- 
lationships between literary texts, images, music, architecture, devotions, traditions, and 
the communities that claim them. 

CH 5052 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations 

Investigate Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century Common Era to the 
present. Specific topics include: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades, the fall of 
Constantinople, the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, and contemporary 
Nigeria, Indonesia, and the U.S. 



101 



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I 



DOCTRINAL STUDIES 

D 4001 Doing Systematic Tineology (CC-A) 

Investigate the nature and methods of systematic theology. After defining theology 
according to Anselm of Canterbury's classic "faith seeking understanding," draw implica- 
tions for doing systematic theology in today's context (Part I), and explore how systematic 
theology is done as a communal, ecclesial enterprise in conversation with Christian tradi- 
tion and the church's teaching office (Part II). Then, investigate the various sources of 
positive theology, survey the methods of speculative theological reflection, and examine 
various theological texts (e.g., patristic, scholastic, neo-orthodox, or liberation theology) 
in terms of the methods employed. 

D 4010 Theologians of Grace 

Grace, both unavoidable and intangible, is the foundation for Christian faith and life. The 
context for grace is freedom; its opposite is sin; its concretization is charism. Look at this 
reality in some writings of the New Testament and then at five major theologies of grace: 
Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, theologians of the Baroque period and 1850- 
1950, and Karl Rahner. Sin and the realizations of grace in art are considered. 

D4011 Theology of Thomas Aquinas 

In recent years new interest has arisen in the theology of Thomas Aquinas. Much of i 

Catholic thought and life from the end of the Middle Ages through Vatican II has drawn 1 
from Aquinas 's teaching. Study the historical context of Aquinas' theology, look at the ] 
theological forms fashioning his way of thinking, and focus on his masterpiece, the 
Summa Theologiae-his theology of God's presence in creation and the graced personality. 
Examine the history of Thomism and how his thought contributes to today's faith and 
church. 

CD 4100 Inculturation and Dialogue: Ministry Across Boundaries 
Building upon and integrating previous studies and experiences, this course enables 
students to attend more closely to the contexts in which they minister, particularly when 
the cultural/social contexts and the ideological or faith convictions encountered are not J 
their own. . I 

DB4100 Witness and Proclamation: The God of Jesus Christ 
Reflect on the God whom Christians proclaim and to whom Christians witness in mission 
and ministry. This God — Holy Mystery — is first manifest in human experience through 
the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, and made visible in the ministry and cross of 
Jesus of Nazareth. The doctrine of God as Trinity is addressed in terms of pastoral prac- | 
tice, method, particular contexts of cultures and religions, and the Christian tradition. 



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D4200 Christology 

A systematic treatment of the foundations of Christology in a post-critical context this 

course is concerned with the possibility of constructing and evaluating Christology after 

one has subjected the Bible to the analysis of historical-critical studies and become 

thoroughly aware of the profound historicity of the Christian faith-community and its 

doctrines. 

DC 4200 Christology and Culture 

Investigate the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. 
Special emphasis is given to emerging christologies in the world church, constructing 
christologies today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ. 

D4201 Ecclesiology 

This course consists of an historical and systematic study of the understanding of the 
church in the Christian tradition and in contemporary thought. Special attention is given 
to ecclesiological themes and issues which are critical for life in the church today. 

DC 4311 introduction to Asian Theologies (CC-R) 

As Christianity becomes post- western, the church in Asia has an increasingly significant 
role in the church of the future. This introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian 
church begins by looking at the context of Asia, then exploring how theology addresses 
the realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia. 

D 4320 Mary and the Christian Tradition ■ 

This course provides an overview of the place of Mary within the Christian tradition 
through an historical survey of Mary as found in scripture, in later theological reflection 
and development (dogma), liturgical celebration, and literature and art. The Gospel pre- 
sentations of the role and significance of Mary are foundational religious expressions 
which are, in turn, articulated by people in other times, places, and cultural contexts. An 
understanding of Mary requires a basic knowledge of the symbols used to express her 
place in the faith of the church as well as the reflections upon those symbols in the various 
cultural contexts of the people of God. 

CD 4326 Developments in Mission Theology 

Mission theologies are formal accounts of different missionary strategies and tactics over 
time and space, which are varied and changing. Survey selected approaches (classical and 
contemporary world), identifying strengths, weaknesses, assumptions, implications, and 
applications to individual ministry. 



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course offerings 



CD 4430 Doing Theology in the Context of Migrations 

This course is dedicated to the elaboration of a theology that deals with the reality of 
migrations particularly in the U.S. Students are exposed to the complexity of this phenom- 
enon through the analysis of theories that explore the reasons why people migrate and the 
historical, political, legal, cultural, and social dynamics of international migration in the 
U.S. Issues of ethnicity, race, and gender are emphasized. Particular attention is given to 
the human and religious experience of the migrants, and students critically relate the real- 
ity of migration with the Christian revelation and traditions. Examine the experience of 
migration as depicted by the Bible, church documents, and theologies on the contempo- 
rary and diverse experience of migrants within the U.S. 

DCH 5001 Cathoiicisnn, U.S. Culture, and the Mission of the Church . 

Investigate the history of Catholicism in the United States, how it has interfaced with U.S. 

culture, and what implications this has for the missionary nature of the church in the U.S. 

context. 

■'I 

D 5002 Theologies of a Personal God 

This seminar investigates the personal nature of God as expressed in the theologies of 
John Calvin, John McCleod Campbell, John Oman, Charles Hartshorne, Sallie McFague, 
and Elizabeth Johnson. 

D 5003 The Creed in the Christian Tradition 

This seminar investigates the nature and function of creeds in the history of Christianity. 
It is based on a careful reading of Jarisalv Pelikan's masterwork. Credo: Historical and 
Theological Guide to Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition. 

D 5004 Theology of Religious Pluralisnn 

With the explosion of information in the last half century on the world's religious tradi- 
tions, it is untenable for religions to continue existing and doing theology independently 
of one another. This course explores the various Christian approaches to the phenomenon 
of religious pluralism, taking note especially of the creative tension pluralism generates 
and the insights it produces for the development of a more contextual Christianity. 

D 5005 Cardinal Newman on the Significance and the Importance of Doctrine in 
the Church 

This seminar deals with the significance of doctrine in the thought of Cardinal Newman. 
Particular attention is given to the following issues: the relationship of doctrine to faith, 
the development of doctrine, the role of doctrine in the life of the church, and infallibility. 



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course offerings 



D5W0 Catholic Theology in the Twentieth Century 

Within a survey of theologians and theological movements in the century since 1919, 
special focus is given to the 1920s, the years leading to Vatican II, and the years since the 
Council. Particular attention is given to theologians Yves Congar and Karl Rahner. 

D5101 God and the Mystery of Human Suffering 

Participants in this seminar study key texts in the Christian tradition which address God's 
relation to suffering people. Among the thinkers studied are the author of Job, Aquinas, 
Julian of Norwich, Wiesel, Moltmann, Gutierrez, Schillebeeckx, Johnson, and John Paul 

II. ■,. ■, ;,. / 

D 5205 Theology of Karl Rahner ' , - 

This course is a study of the major issues in Rahner 's theology from the perspective of his 
philosophical background. 

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia 

Explore the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue, including the influence of 
personal, social, and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, 
the texts of Christian scriptures and teachings are investigated to discern the church's 
theology of religions. 

DC 531 1 Readings in Asian Theology 

This is a reading course on the writings of key Christian theologians — especially on how 

they address the issues arising from the context and realities of Asia. Among the major 

themes examined from an Asian perspective are post-colonialism, contextualization, 

hermeneutics, theological methods, inculturation, integral liberation, and interreligious 

dialogue. 

BD 5510 Feminist Hermeneutics in Bible and Theology 

This team-taught seminar investigates biblical texts and doctrinal themes such as God, 
Christ, Trinity, creation, theological anthropology, sin and evil, Mary, church, and ministry 
from a feminist perspective. 

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology in Intercultural Perspective 
This doctoral seminar focuses on emerging issues in theological anthropology in the 
world church today, as well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the 
human being. Emphasis is placed on the different contexts in which these issues and 
challenges are encountered. 



105 



course offerings 



CD 6001 Inculturation 

Much misunderstood, inculturation is carefully explicated, theoretically and practically 
and study methods by which Christianity and a culture may actually encounter each other 
are offered. The outcome (with the Spirit and local people) is a new reality: the people of 
God transformed. 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

E 4001 Living the Moral Life (CC-A) 

An introduction to the basic themes of the Christian moral life including its personal, 
social, and cosmic dimensions. Using classical texts and contemporary case studies, focus 
on the particular sources, authorities, and methods of the Roman Catholic ethical tradi- 
tion. Attention is given to the relationship between methods of systematic theology and 
ethical methods. 

BMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the Integrity of Creation, and Reconciliation: Living the 
Values of the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian 
ministry with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologi- 
cally threatened and violent world. The disciplines of social ethics and pastoral ministry 
are emphasized. 

E 4200 Ethics of Power and Racism 

When ethical norms are articulated in a field of power, they often construct a moral/ 
immoral binary, effectively constructing morality's "other." This course explores the 
numerous ways that, particularly white northern Europeans created and sustained such 
norms. The resuh was various forms of colonization and enslavement of those defined as 
"other" which had the effect of forming, shaping, and sustaining racism that has continued 
to the present day. 

E 4205 Natural Law of Christian Ethics ' I 

Survey the relevance of some Western and non- Western natural law traditions in view of 
establishing a vision of a universal common good that can generate a Christian ethical 
discourse capable of intercultural and interreligious communication. 

£ 4207 Ethical Significance of Christian Hunnanism 

This course is a critical study of the debate about the existence and nature of Christian 

humanism and its relevance for the ethos and mission of the church. 



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E 4208 Proclaiming Shalom in a Violent World 

How does the church understand and actuate its mediatory role between God's offer 
of peace in Christ and the search for peace on the part of the human community? The 
question is approached historically and systematically. 

E4310 Christ, Community, and the Moral Life 

This course is designed to study the implications of Christology for the life of the 
Christian community as an ethical community in an increasingly secular, scientific, 
and culturally and religiously pluralistic world. 

E 431 5 Medical Ethics 

Study the relation of general ethical principles and methods to the concerns of the medical 
profession. Among topics treated are experimentation with human subjects, organ 
transplantation, genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization, access to health care, and the 
interrelationships between the rights of patients, doctors, and society. 

E 4342 World Poverty, Development, and Life's Liberation 
Investigate and assess the world's division into rich and poor countries. Study poverty, 
development, and liberation in the light of scripture and Catholic social teaching using 
today's kairos for Christian communities as focus. 

E 4344 Global Economic Justice and Christian Faith 

We dare not provide an ethic of economic life that is not in strict relation to an ethic of 
political life and an ethic of communication. A Christian ethic must test its claims to 
normativity by the difference it makes for these interrelationships. 

E 4345 Spirituality, Liturgy, and the Quest for Justice 

Examine how classic and contemporary spiritualities incorporate justice into their frame- 
work. The Ignatian Exercises and feminist and ecological forms of spirituality are 
analyzed along with key figures such as Thomas Merton. Considers authentic ways 
in which justice can be incorporated into liturgical celebration. 

E 4400 Care for the Earth: Ethics and the Environment 

This course focuses on the need for Christians to reverence the environment and the 
behaviors that need to follow from that reverence. Various environmental ethics methods 
are explored. Christian and Jewish sources, especially the Franciscan tradition and 
Catholic magisterial statements are plumbed. 



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CE 4400 Mission and Peacemal<ing 

Systemic violence (social, cultural, economic, political, and ecological) is globally wide- 
spread. Drawing on Catholic social teaching, theology of peace, and some contextual 
pastoral experiences, develop a theological and pastoral vision for the praxis of social 
peacemaking 

E 4405 Sexual Ethics for the Christian 

A study of sexuality and sexual behavior, especially among unmarried Christians. It 
investigates the moral tradition, the elements which form a contemporary Christian vision 
of sexuality, and how these relate to sexual conduct. , 

E 4406 Marriage as a Sacramental Life ^ 

This course examines the development of the theology of marriage in the Roman Catholic 
tradition. Special attention is given to the sacramental character of marriage, dimensions 
of married life, and the importance of fidelity. 

E5100 Holocaust and Genocide: Ethical Reflections 

An examination of major ethical issues arising within the Nazi Holocaust. Topics include 
anti-Semitism, the loss of personal morality, God and ethical decision making, the impor- 
tance of ritual in shaping ethical behavior, ethics and unjust structures, and human rights. 
Ethical issues in modern genocides such as Rwanda, Bosnia, and Cambodia are also 
considered. 

E 5101 Ethics and Ennotions 

In the Catholic moral tradition, theologians have often perceived emotions as hindrances 
in ethical decision making. This course asks whether such a perception is valid and 
attempts to articulate a framework for understanding the interrelation between the 
Christian's emotional and moral life. 

E5102 Annbiguity in Moral Decision Making 

A critical assessment of the ways in which recent appropriations of the Roman Catholic 
moral tradition have dealt with ambiguous cases. Among the areas covered are the princi- 
ple of double effect (with its direct/indirect distinction), the methodology of basic goods, 
proportionalism, and casuistry. 

E5105 Christian Perspectives on War and Peace \ 

An examination of perspectives on war and peace within the Christian tradition. Both 
historical position and contemporary outlooks are considered. Special attention is given 
to the developments within Catholicism since the U.S. Bishop s Peace Pastoral as well as 
church statements since the Gulf War. 



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E 5200 Ethics and Christian Adult Relationships 

This course explores the ethical dimensions of Christian adult relationships. Humans are 
formed and shaped in the moral life by their relationships and commitments. Topics such as 
just love, fidelity, commitment, and mutuality are explored. Beginning with the patristic 
period to the present, the work of saints, prophets, and martyrs is examined for what they 
teach us about the moral meaning of adult, Christian, faithful, committed relationships. 

E 5201 Mutuality: Definition and Probative Value 

Underlying most discussions about power are assumptions that are ruled by dualism 
which alienates men/women, humans/nature, affect/reason, personal/social, and 
sacred/secular. This course defines "mutuality" and explores the difference it makes when 
used within a Christian ethical framework. 

E 5204 Love and Justice 

Various ethical systems have developed around the central theme of love or of justice or 
their interaction. Differences in the understanding of these concepts constitute different 
approaches to morality. This seminar analyzes, compares, and critically assesses the ways 
in which these themes function in Christian ethics and theology. 

E 5205 Ethics and Moral Pluralisnn 

Moral pluralism has been a defining factor in moral reflection. This seminar explores 
recent work on the prospects for a common morality using philosophical analysis of 
pluralism, examining human rights as a kind of common morality, and studying Hans 
Kiing's Global Ethic and the Parliament of World Religions. Special attention is given 
to Catholic moral theological issues raised by these discussions. 

E5210 Politics and Christian Conscience 

An exploration of the relation of Christian life to political life. The origin, place, and role 
of conscience in both are investigated. Conscience is related to the historical realities of 
community and traditions and to the unity of theory and practice in the exercise of politi- 
cal conscience. 

E5215 Religion and the Shaping of Public Ethical Values 

A seminar studying the public role of religion in shaping values in global society. Church- 
state relations and human rights are considered. 

E 5220 Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of revolution and liberation in classical western 
political philosophy. Third World thought, and present-day theological and ethical litera- 
ture. Special attention is given to Latin American liberation theology. 



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E 5320 The Making of Moral Theology 

This course is an overview of the development of CathoHc moral theology from the patris- 
tic period to the present. Special attention given to the directions and concerns of Catholic 
morality since the Second Vatican Council. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPIRITUALITY AND PASTORAL MINISTRY (SPM) 
Gilberto Cavazos-Gonzalez, O.F.M., Mary Frohlich, R.S.C.J., Paul Lachance, O.F.M. 
Carmen Nanko-Fernandez 



SPIRITUALITY STUDIES 

S 4001 Spiritual Companioning for Ministry (CC-P) 

This course provides foundational understanding and experience of being with others 
within a spiritual companioning context. Focus on the art and ministry of spiritual 
companioning and the practical applications in diverse ministerial settings. Issues such 
as listening skills, reverence of individual differences, and discernment are explored. The 
course design includes input, discussion, and practicum. 

WS4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality 
This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. Includes reading, 
discussion, lecture, and practical exercises. 

54310 Spiritual Classics of the Early Church 

Study of selections from the most influential spiritual writings of the second to sixth 
centuries: Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Desert Fathers and 
Mothers, Benedict, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and others. 

54311 Spirituality of Lay Vocation and Ministry 

This course addresses the concept of vocation and ministry as it impacts all who identify 
themselves as disciples of Jesus Christ, with special emphasis on the role of the laity in 
the Roman Catholic Church. Explore the history of the laity in the church and develop 
both a theology and spirituality of lay ministry based on contemporary scholarship and 
the lived experience of lay ministers in a variety of settings. 

54312 Theology and Practice of Prayer 

The course is an introduction to traditional and contemporary methods of Christian prayer 
and its stages of development. The process entails learning from some of the great teach- 
ers of prayer within the Christian tradition, as well as drawing insights from the contribu- 



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tion of other religious traditions. Provides the theological grounding necessary to evaluate 
and critique prayer practices, and interweaves theory and praxis. 

54313 Perspectives on Psychological and Spiritual Transformation and Maturity 
This course looks at several of the major perspectives or models of human maturity. 
What are the psychological and spiritual ingredients that contribute to the development 
of mature adults? How do psychology and spirituality contribute to the development of 
mature Christians? A lecture-seminar format is used. 

54314 Religious Life in Context 

Explore the understanding of religious life in various historical and cultural contexts. 
Topics include 1) the various forms of religious life and the historical situations that gave 
rise to them, 2) the understanding of the vows and how these are expressed differently in 
different social-cultural contexts, and 3) religious life in the world and church today. 

SH 4340 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Movement 
Study the historical development of the Franciscan Family begun by Francis and Clare of 
Assisi and their perspective on Gospel living. Consider the spirituality that has inspired 
reformations within the family and moved the brothers and sisters into ministry, taking 
into account the three orders begun by Francis as well as the contemporary so-called 
"fourth Order." 

BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality 

The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to 
establish the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to bibli- 
cal images for God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for 
justice and peace in the biblical world and in our own. 

SH 5001 Christian History and Spirituality through Art and Architecture in Italy 
A handful of significant cities have been the backdrop for many of the important events 
and people that have shaped our Christian faith. This interdisciplinary course studies sig- 
nificant moments and figures pertaining to our history and spirituality. This two-week 
team-taught course takes place every other summer in the Italian cities of Rome, Assisi, 
Florence, and Ravenna. Topics include the catacombs and martyrdom spirituality, early 
medieval church images and edifices, mendicant spirituality as well as early Franciscan 
visual and literary history, the politics and pictorial programs at work in Ravenna, and the 
church's role in the Florentine Renaissance. Students learn on site about the role of art and 
architecture in promoting the Christian faith. 



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course offerings 



CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse 
The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses and violence in our world challenges the 
missionary /minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to 
develop a spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. 
Not open to audit. 

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today 

Explore discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing lives 
and in a changing world. First, we are called, then sent; the initiative and the agenda are 
not our own. Ponder the implications and applications. 

SC 5020 Hispanic Spirituality: History and Religiosity 

Focuses on the foundations; beliefs, and challenges of Hispanic/Latino spirituality. The 
course covers topics like: Mesoamerican and medieval Spanish religiosity; what Latinos 
believe about God, Mary, humanity, evil, etc.; and finally, the challenge of evangelizing 
popular religiosity and of enhancing Latino interest in the Word of God, justice, and liber- 
ation. 

CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue 

In dialogue with Lakota Native Americans who practice traditional spirituality and/or 
Christian faith, this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/min- 
istry. Includes a weeklong field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in 
South Dakota. 

SC 5040 Islannic Mysticism and Spirituality 

An exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purification 
known as "Sufism." Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobriety 
and ecstasy; the stages and states of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and 
classical Sufi poetry. 

S5101 Foundations and Methods for the Study of Spirituality 
Defines spirituality as a field of study, explores the relationship between spiritual praxis 
and research in spirituality, surveys research methods, evaluates the notion of a "spiritual 
classic," and examines issues in the historical study of spirituality. 

S 51 10 Spiritual Formation Seminar 

This course considers traditional and contemporary models and issues of Christian spiritual 
growth whether they take place at home, in the parish, in ecclesial movements, in religious 
life, in studies, or in secular places and situations. 



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S 5212 Advanced Seminar in Spiritual Direction 

A seminar for those with experience practicing spiritual direction, the course involves 
reading and reflection of major theoretical perspectives on spiritual direction in the light 
of participants' ministry experiences. 

WS 5301 Patterns of Christian Prayer 

This seminar examines the historical development of non-eucharistic liturgical prayer 
from early Christian prayer patterns through the reforms of Vatican II. This historical- 
comparative approach provides the context for inquiring to what extent there is an implied 
spirituality in the form, structure, and performance of such prayer; and how this might be 
beneficial to contemporary prayer practice. 

S 5310 Spirituality for the New Millennium 

This seminar delineates the main lines of a spirituality which holds promise for the future 

as it emerges from the stories and the writings of the leading mediating figures of our 

time. 



PASTORAL MINISTRY STUDIES 

EMP 4100 Justice, Peace, the Integrity of Creation and Reconciliation: Living the 
Values of the Reign of God 

Students are introduced to Catholic social teaching and equipped for committed Christian 
ministry with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologi- 
cally threatened and violent world. The disciplines of social ethics and pastoral ministry 
are emphasized. 

MP 4200 Human Development and Interpersonal Relations for Ministry 
Relying on case studies, various scenarios, and the student's life experiences that illustrate 
complex human dilemmas, explore an array of effective and ineffective ministerial actions 
and responses. Included are pertinent readings, engagement in group dialogue and role- 
play, skills at evaluating ministerial practice, and theological reflection. Designed for 
those seeking an integrative vision of pastoral ministry that blends theory and praxis, this 
course offers knowledge for public ministers in contemporary practice of pastoral 
ministry in a variety of settings. 

MPC 4300 Pastoral Challenges of Cultural Diversity 

Cultural diversity is a growing phenomenon in the new global context. By engaging par- 
ticipants in an intercultural learning process, this course prepares pastoral leaders to deal 
with challenges of cultural diversity in their communities. 



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MP 4306 Pastoral Ministry: Developing Skills and Competencies for Cooperative 

Leadership 

Explore ministry as an experience of accompaniment witli shared responsibilities and 
accountabilities. Attention is given to means and resources for cultivating effective leader- 
ship styles, developing pastoral plans and strategies, creating and sustaining networks, and 
addressing conflict and boundary situations. 

MP 4307 Pastoral Ministry: Care, Counseling, and Presence 

Explore ministry from the perspectives of providing care, counseling, and presence within 
the context of community. Each of these aspects of ministry is examined with respect to 
the skills, resources, networks, and theological understandings necessary for effective 
pastoral responses. 

MP 4308 Pastoral Ministry in Ordinary Time 

Explore ministry as a daily lived experience of accompanying communities and individuals 
on their journeys of faith. Attention is given to theological frameworks, means and 
resources for cultivating ministerial identity, encouraging shared responsibilities, develop- 
ing pastoral strategies, creating and sustaining networks, and addressing the daily practical 
realities of pastoral ministry. 

MPC 4308 Pastoral Care in an African-American Context 

Explore the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of an 

African- American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African- American 

experience and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. 

Students develop a better understanding/ability to minister in the African- American 

community. 

MP 4309 Pastoral Ministry as Justice Praxis 

Examine the theological frameworks, means, and resources for empowering ministers and 
communities to engage justly. Attention is given to Catholic social teaching as it is lived in 
witness and in practice. Practical skills and competencies include but are not limited to 
community organizing, preaching and teaching. 

MP 4310 Collaborative Skills for Administration in Ministry 

This series of six one-day intensive seminars, led by professionals in each field, teaches 
students how to be effective and responsible stewards of the resources in their ministry- 
people, property, facilities, and finances. The practical areas addressed are: leadership 
styles, management of workplace relationships, personnel issues, financial and facilities 
management; public relations and marketing, and stewardship and fundraising. 



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MP 431 1 Pastoral Ministry Across Generations 

This course explores theological frameworks, means and resources for ministering to indi- 
viduals and communities across the age spectrum. Pastoral responses that address specific 
and developmental needs will be considered as well as those creating opportunities for 
nurturing healthy intergenerational relationships. 

MPC5101 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Asian and Pacific Island Contexts 
Asian and Pacific Island populations are a growing presence within the U.S. Catholic 
church. This course explores the history, experiences, and diversity of these communities 
and the implications for pastoral ministry. 

MPC 5102 Pastoral Ministry: Responding to Diversity in Community 
Increasingly, diversity in communities is accompanied by specific and at times, competing 
needs. This course explores theological frameworks and the pastoral means and resources 
for addressing issues of access with respect towards promoting increased participation in 
communal life and worship. Issues addressed include but are not limited to language, 
space, resources, leadership, marginality, and communities in transition. 

MP 5 1 02 Pastoral Ministry on Campus 

This course explores theological frameworks, means and resources for developing strate- 
gies, creating networks, and providing pastoral ministry in educational contexts and 
within academic communities. 

MPC 5 1 03 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Hispanic/Latino/a Contexts 
Demographics indicate that Latinos/as currently constitute the largest and fastest growing 
population in the U.S. Catholic church. This course explores the history, experiences and 
diversity of this community and the implications for pastoral ministry. 



DEPARTMENT OF WORD AND WORSHIP (WW) 

Eileen Crowley, Edward Foley, Capuchin, Rev. Richard Fragomeni, Richard McCarron, 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.FM. 

W 4001 Communication Skills for Ministry (CC-P) 

Examine the nature and dynamics of the human communication process as it applies to: 
1) oral interpretation of written texts; 2) rhetorical design and public discourse; 3) the use 
of mass media; 4) interpersonal communication; and 5) non-verbal and ritual expressions. 
Attention is given to the cross-cultural and ministerial dimensions of these forms of com- 
munication. 



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WS4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecciesiai Spirituality 
This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and 
communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. Reading, discussion, 
lecture, and practical exercises. 

W4110 Holy Week: Liturgy Preaching, and Presiding (CC-P) 
Examine in an integrated fashion the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, specifically 
Passion Sunday and the Triduum. Included are the historical and theological study of Holy 
Week; celebration of and mystagogical reflection on the current rites; issues in preparing, 
preaching, and presiding during Holy Week and Triduum; the interplay of liturgical 
celebration and popular religiosity; and reflection on liturgical spirituality fostered 
through and from the rites. 

W4200 Sacraments I: Initiation & Reconciliation 

Theological, historical, and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of 
initiation and reconciliation. Particular attention given to: the RCIA as norm for initiatory 
practice; the relation of sacramental reconciliation to the church's life; and foundations of 
practical skills for celebration. 

W 4201 Sacraments II: Eucharist and Sacramental Theology 

This is a general introduction to sacramental theology, and a particular introduction to the 

Eucharist — its history, theology, structure, and practice. 

W 4202 Presiding Practicum 

A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of 
sacramental rites including initiation, weddings, anointing, wakes, and funerals. Special 
emphasis given to Eucharist and Reconciliation. Prerequisite: Sacraments I and II 

W4203 Liturgical Preaching 

This practicum examines the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. 

Participants consider liturgical, pastoral, cultural, and practical dynamics of preaching. 

W 4204 Canon Law 

An introductory course addressing the nature, role, and history of canon law; church 

structures and ministries; and law regulating sacramental practice. 

W4205 Lay Leadership of Prayer and Preaching 

A practicum to develop competency in the leadership of the community's prayer, includ- 
ing Hours, catechumenal rites, the funeral Vigil, penitential liturgies, liturgies of Word and 
Communion, and ministry to the sick and dying. In conjunction with these settings, also 



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considers the liturgical, canonical, and pastoral dynamics and practical skills of lay 
preaching in catechesis and worship. Prerequisite: Sacraments I or II. 

W 4300 Advanced Preaching 

This practicum addresses specific pastoral and cultural contexts for preaching, e.g., 

preaching specific sacramental rites (weddings and funerals), preaching various aspects 

of the church year (a cycle of the lectionary or particular feasts and seasons), or preaching 

in distinctive cultural contexts (Hispanic or Asian). Prerequisite: Liturgical Preaching, 

W4203. 

W 4301 Rituals of Sickness, Dying, and Death 

Examine the Christian liturgical response to sickness, dying, and death with particular 
attention to the Roman Catholic Pastoral Care of the Sick {\9'^2) and Order of Christian 
Funerals (1985). Explore the rites of other denominations and emerging rituals for healing, 
dying, burial, and bereavement. The course integrates theological study of the rites, pas- 
toral enactment and evaluation, contemporary theological reflection on illness and death, 
and the practices of preaching and pastoral care in a multicultural context. 

CW 4301 Initiation and Contextualization 

After studying the general characteristics of Christian initiation and other types of initiation 
as cultural-religious phenomena throughout human history, the seminar focuses on the 
theological, cultural, liturgical, and pastoral issues in the hoUstic process of contextualizing 
initiation in particular Christian contexts. 

W 5105 Liturgical Year 

This seminar is designed as a theological, historical, cultural, and pastoral exploration of 

the church year through the lens of practical theology. 

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation 

This seminar explores the inculturation of the church's worship in both historical and con- 
temporary perspective with emphasis on current methodological and theological issues 
raised by the engagement of the church with contemporary cultures promoted by Vatican 11. 

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Community 

This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities com- 
prising people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It takes up the dynamics of 
intercultural engagement, assumptions and principles relating to multiculturalism, liturgy, 
and popular religiosity, conceptual and practical groundwork, and models for liturgy that 
embrace the plurality of cultures in a respectful, inclusive way. 



17 



course offerings 



\NC 5208 Eucharist in Cross-Cultural Context 

This team-taught course is an anthropological-Hturgical study of the Eucharist to uncover 
possible universals for relating western eucharistic tradition to symbolism and life-experience 
of other cultures and to sketch issues and principles for shaping Eucharist cross-culturally. 
Prerequisite: Sacraments II, W420 1 . 

V\/5210 Liturgical Catechesis 

Drawing upon the nature of liturgical celebration and principles of adult education, this 
seminar explores the nature and role of liturgical catechesis and mystagogy, and examines 
several models for experientially-based learning and formation for adult worshipers. 

W 5225 Worship in Media Cultures 

This cyclic seminar provides theological and liturgical foundations for reflecting on 
various liturgical arts, e.g., liturgical music, architecture and the shaping of places for 
worship, and contemporary media arts. 

W5227 Shaping Places for Worship 

Using a range of media and methods, this seminar examines liturgical, spatial, artistic, 

and human issues involved in shaping places for worship. 

W 5230 Liturgical Methods 

This seminar introduces students to the major methodological trends in the field of liturgy 
through classic texts which employ or describe these methods. Students engage both in 
the reading of the classic texts, and in the exploration of the strengths and weakness of the 
various methods by applying them to a study of eucharistic prayers. 

W 5240 Ritual Studies 

This seminar explores the ritual dimensions of liturgical celebration. Student presentations 

are based on field observation and readings in ritual theory from various social sciences. 

W 524 1 Liturgical History j 

This course provides an overview of Christian liturgy from its Jewish matrix until the 
present, especially in the west. It introduces significant movements, places, events, liturgi- 
cal sources, and individuals that provide basic historical, social, cultural, and theological 
frameworks for understanding the development of Christian worship. 

WS 5301 Patterns of Christian Prayer 

This seminar examines the historical development of non-eucharistic liturgical prayer 
from early Christian prayer patterns through the reforms of Vatican II. This historical- 
comparative approach provides the context for inquiring to what extent there is an implied 



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spirituality in the form, structure, and performance of such prayer; and how this might be 
beneficial to contemporary prayer practice. 

BW 5500 Biblical Hermeneutics for Preaching 

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to a process of integrating contempla- 
tion, biblical and theological study, and pastoral praxis for a ministry of preaching. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

1 4010 Healthy Human Sexual Developnnent for Ministry 

Designed to raise awareness that sexuality is a constitutive part of the human person as a 
minister, this course assists ministers from any culture to own and integrate this concept. 
The impact of human sexuality and issues of power in all aspects of ministry are 
explored and students hone skills and gain confidence in integrating sexuality as part of 
ministerial identity. Among the ideas fostered are that sexuality is an expression of God- 
given goodness, and one matures in self-understanding throughout life's journey. Team 
taught by men and women who are lay and religious, the major themes are: spirituality 
and sexuality; ethics of power and sexuality; psychology and sexuality; physiology, 
anatomy, and sexuality; and practical integration for ministry, (second year course) 

14310 M.A.PS. Colloquium 

This adult learning seminar for M.A.P.S. degree candidates facilitates the integration of 

ministry experience with the art form of theological reflection in ministry. 

1 5999 Capstone 

Designed as a culminating experience for M.Div. students, this seminar employs the 

methods of practical theology and is rooted in small group work. It helps students assess 

the extent of ministerial integration thus far, and plan for continuing integration after 

graduation. 

1 6005 D.Min. Core I 

This beginning seminar for all beginning D.Min. students initiates the process of analyzing 
present ministerial practice to discern the embedded theologies. Participants are introduced 
to various theoretical frameworks to develop fluency as a practical theologian. 

1 6010 D.Min. Core II 

The second required methods seminar for all D.Min. students, its dual purpose is to provide 
extended reflection on the nature of leadership and to help each student craft a defensible 
thesis-project proposal. 



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FIELD EDUCATION 

M 4203 M.Div. Ministry Practicum 

M 4204 M.A.RS. Ministry Practicum 
M 4205 M.Div. Summer Immersion Practicum 
M 4206 Oversees Training Program (OTP) 
M 4950 Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) 



PHILOSOPHY STUDIES 

M.Div. and M.A. students can fulfill degree program philosophy requirements by taking 
the appropriate variety of 2000 level non-credit courses offered through the Philosophy 
Studies program. 



PHILOSOPHY PREREQUISITES 

P2100 History of Ancient Philosophy 

Probes the question of what philosophers do and why. With some treatment of the pre- 
Socratic tradition and the influence of the ancient Asian tradition, the major focus is on 
the epistemology of Plato and the metaphysics and ethics of Aristotle. 

P2101 History of Medieval Philosophy 

Focuses on the interaction between philosophy and theology in the construction of major 
styles of logic and theology from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Questions are viewed 
from the Jewish, Islamic, and Christian perspectives with a study of key representatives of 
these traditions. Vital for students considering further studies in patristics. 

P 2102 History of Modern Philosophy 

Major figures discussed include Descartes, the English and Continental rationalists, the 
empiricists, Kant, Hegel and Marx, Feurebach, and Nietzsche. Particular emphasis is 
given to the impact of these philosophical positions on the doing of theology. 

P2103 History of Contemporary Philosophy 

Highlights the issue of language in linguistic analysis, particularly the work of Russell, 

Ayer, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Derrida, and Levinas. Studies the emergence of 



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existential phenomenology in Sartre, the process philosophy of A.Whitehead, and emerg- 
ing contributions of contemporary Asian, African, and Latin American philosophical 
movements. 

P2180 Philosophy for Future Theologians 

Traces the history of the relationship between theology (faith) and philosophy (reason or 
the intellect). Studies the impact of key philosophical thinkers on the methods and history 
of theology. Introduces students to the growing convergence between philosophers and 
theologians in the face of contemporary issues. Special attention given to the role of sci- 
entific methodologies and their consequences for the future study of systematic, biblical, 
and pastoral theology. 

P 2220 Critical Thinking and Applied Logic 

Introductory course focuses on the problem of human knowledge and cognitive claims as 
responses to skepticism. Covers the structure of argument, fallacy detection, and truth 
analysis. Considers the role of logic in shaping worldviews, text books, media coverage, 
and intercultural epistemology. 

P2221 Philosophy of the Human Person 

Beginning with Socrates up to Simone De Beauvoir and the cyber-postmoderns, explores 
historically the various dimensions of what it means to be human and to know humanity. 
Considers topics such as the will, body-mind dualism, conscience, the ego, sexuality, 
individual as person, action, and the structure of community. 

P 2222 American Philosophy and the History of Social Institutions 

Explores the relationship between American theorists (Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey) 

and the shaping and maintenance of American cultural and social institutions. Considers 

the relationship between immigrant narratives, their art, and religion in the "American 

Institution." 

P 2223 Philosophy of Art 

Examines the key role of various aesthetical theories and their roles in answering "what is 
art?" Attention is given to the role of criticism, taste, multimedia art, icons, also the non- 
plastic arts such as music, dance, and drama in shaping the expressive dimension of the 
human person and his or her multifaceted, transnational culture. Interaction with various 
art institutions and artists in Chicago is expected. 

P2300 Philosophical Ethics 

Traditional Catholic ethics has based itself on the history and development of the natural 

law theory. This course traces the development of the human person as ethical subject. 



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Various contemporary positions of ethics are also present. Special attention to the thought 
of Bernard Lonergan and his influence on ethical decision making. 

P 2301 Perspectives in the Philosopliy of Death 

Starting with the death of Socrates, Jesus, the Buddha, and Mohammed, philosophers have 
considered the question of death and afterlife to be a core metaphysical question. Using 
Heidegger's phenomenological method, explores various cultural, religious, and philosophical 
perspectives concerning death and "the beyond." Explores the "denial of death" in a post 
holocaust world. Asks whether an appropriate philosophy of death necessarily shapes one's 
philosophy of life. 

P 2302 Issues in Philosophical Hermeneutics 

Surveys the history of hermeneutics and addresses such concepts as the canon in conflict- 
ing meanings, the role of interpretation, feminist and contextual hermeneutics, the 
hermeneutics of suspicion and generosity, and participatory hermeneutics. Presents the 
repercussions of the history of hermeneutics of contemporary theology. 

P 2303 Philosophy of Science 

Examine the basic structure of scientific method and the major theories of modern 
physics within that context. This is treated with a view to the historical, philosophical and 
social implications of the practice of science in its contemporary form. Special attention is 
given to the several key contemporary scientific theorists, especially Thomas Kuhn. 

P 2304 Philosophy of God 

Examine the problem of God, the proofs for God's existence, and the naming of the tran- 
scendent deity in eastern and western cultures. Using the phenomenological method, 
explore the philosophical structure of thought which underpins the study of theos and 
logos. 

P 2305 The Phenomenology of Religion 

An introduction to the method of phenomenology as applied to the manifestation of 
religion. Topics such as myth, taboo, the holy, the sacred, the ritual, and sacred texts are 
presented. The positions of Otto, Eliade, van der Leeuw, Malinowski, Smart and Smith, 
and Durkheim are considered. Opportunity to interact with the various religious 
organizations in Chicago. 

P 2400 Philosophical Texts: Thonnas Aquinas 

A detailed study of the key concepts and texts of this important philosopher and theologian. 

The movements of original Thomism and neo-Thomism are presented. 



122 



course offerings 



P2401 Philosophica! Texts 

Aims at a close reading of the work and life of a major philosophical figure pertinent 

either to classical or contemporary philosophical thought. 

P2402 Philosophical Texts: International Readings in Political Philosophy 
Analyze key texts and thinkers that continue to shape the political and socioeconomic 
thinking of western and non- western countries. Consider the relationship between philos- 
ophy and democracy, culture, methods of social liberation, development, international 
conflict and peace, minority and majority rights. 



123 



academic information 



-:•* 




The religious orders who 
send seminarians to CTU 
have imbued this place 
with a dynamic ecclesied 
vision, iniernationa! flavor, 
and a focus on the 
Catholic Church as a 
glolial people of faith. 



124 



academic information 

Admissions Policies 

The academic programs of Catholic Theological Union are open 
to all qualified students who wish to prepare for ministry or 
desire to study theology in the Roman Catholic tradition for per- 
sonal growth. Applications for admission are available from the 
Director of Recruitment and Admissions. Unless other arrange- 
ments have been made, completed applications are due three 
weeks before the beginning of a term. For specific dates for this 
academic year contact the Admissions Office. 

Applicants for degree programs who have not completed their 
applications by three weeks before the beginning of a term may be 
admitted to course work in that term as a continuing education stu- 
dent. Continuing education students may take up to four courses 
for credit that can be later applied to a degree program. Students 
intending to apply these courses to the M.A. program must so 
designate when they register. To transfer into a degree program, 
continuing education students must apply to the Admissions 
Committee for change of status, and complete the remaining 
portions of the application process by the fifth week of the term. 

Admission and Advancement Criteria 

Catholic Theological Union as a school of theology and ministry 
prepares people for the service of the church. The good of the 
church is the chief criterion for decisions concerning whether or 
not to accept, advance, and graduate any student in programs 
preparing people for professional ministry. Thus, Catholic 
Theological Union reserves the right to accept or to reject any 
applicant, the right to advance or dismiss any student, and the 
right to recommend or refuse any student for graduation. All such 
decisions made by Catholic Theological Union are final. 



125 



academic information 

General Admissions Requirements 

1 . A bachelor's degree or its educational equivalent from an 
approved college or university 

A limited number of students without a baccalaureate degree 
or its equivalent can be admitted as special students with cer- 
tain conditions. 

2. A completed application form 

r 

3. Payment ofa non-refundable application fee 

4. CTU reserves the right to require a formal evaluation of 
applicants and a personal interview with admissions officials. 

5. Degree students must submit a writing sample that will be 
assessed by the Language Resource and Writing Center at 
McCormick Theological Seminary. Students are ordinarily 
required to follow the recommendations for improvement of 
writing skills that may result from this assessment. 

Specific Admissions Requirements 

Master of Divinity Program 

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, appli- 
cants for the M.Div. program should normally have a liberal arts 
background, including courses in philosophy and undergraduate 
theology. Specific admission requirements include: 
1 . Three letters of recommendation from persons who can attest 
to the applicant's suitability for graduate study and ministry. 
Note: Applicants from participating religious communities 
are not required to submit these letters since sponsorship by a 
participating community constitutes adequate recommenda- 
tion. If the community withdraws its sponsorship or if the 
student leaves the community, the student is required to 
present a new application with letters of recommendation, 



126 



academic information 

one of which must come from an official representative of the 
former community. Students in the Augustus Tolton Scholars 
program and the Oscar Romero Scholars program who dis- 
continue participation in those programs must likewise pres- 
ent a new application with letters of recommendation. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended 
by the applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the Registrars 
of these schools directly to the Admissions Office. 

3. Academic prerequisites: 

Track I Track II 

9 semester hours of philosophy 30 semester hours of philosophy 

12 semester hours of 
undergraduate theology 

Note: A selection of non-credit courses in philosophy is offered 
to help M.Div. students meet the prerequisites in philosophy for 
this degree. Track II students may take Foundational and 
Complementary Core theology courses to meet the prerequisites 
in theology/religious studies. Advanced standing rather than 
credit will be given in those theological areas. 

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program 
In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, appli- 
cants for the M.A.RS. program should have three consecutive 
years of ministry in a situation of responsibility, leadership, and 
continuous involvement, e.g., a parish catechetical leader, liturgi- 
cal coordinator, youth minister, or RCIA director. Specific 
admission requirements include: " \ 

1 . Three letters of recommendation from persons who can attest 
to the applicant's suitability for graduate study and ministry 



127 



academic information 

Note: Applicants from participating religious communities 
are not required to submit these letters. 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended 
by the applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the Registrars 
of these schools directly to the Admissions Office. 

3. Some background in theology, philosophy, psychology, and 
sociology is recommended. 

4. Three years of experience in communicating religious values 
to others. 

Master of Arts (Theology) Program 

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, appli- 
cants for the M.A. program should have: 

1 . Three letters of recommendation from persons who can attest 
to the applicant's suitability for graduate study. 

Note: Applicants from participating religious communities 
are not required to submit these letters. ' 

2. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended 
by the applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the Registrars 
of these schools directly to the Admissions Office. 

3. An undergraduate major in theology or religious studies, 1 8 
semester hours, (27 quarter hours) in theology or demonstra- 
tion of equivalent preparation. 

Note: Foundational and Complementary Core theology 
courses may be taken to meet the prerequisites in theology/ 
religious studies. Please consuh the M.A. director for details. 

4. Two 3 semester hour courses in philosophy. Philosophy 
prerequisites can be taken at CTU. 

Doctor of Ministry Program 



128 



academic information 



The CTU com- 
munity celebrates 
liturgy together 
throughout the 
year. 





if-- 




f lull 


^*"HM 




life 



In addition to meeting the general admission requirements, appli- 
cants for the D.Min. program should have: 

1 . The M.Div. degree or the equivalent of three years of gradu- 
ate theological studies with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade 
point average. 

2. Five years of full-time ministry, ordinarily following the 
applicant's first ministerial degree. 

3 . Submission of a detailed curriculum vitae. 

4. Official transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended 
by the applicant. Transcripts are to be sent by the Registrars 
of these schools directly to the director of the D.Min. pro- 
gram. 

5. A 1 500-word essay that includes a statement of the appli- 
cant's personal goals in ministry, a descriptive self-assess- 
ment of the applicant's ministry, and an annotated list of 
readings in theology and ministry over the last two years 



129 



academic information 

6. Three letters of recommendation, including one from an 
ecclesiastical superior and one attesting to the applicant's 
academic abilit\'. 

Note: The deadline for completing the D.Min. application is 
April 15. 

Certificate Programs, Continuing Education, 

and Special Students 

Smdents interested in these areas must submit: 

1 . .\n official transcript from one post-secondary school 
Transcripts are to be sent by the registrars of these schools 
directly to the Admissions Office. 

2. One letter of recommendation from a person who can attest 
to the applicant's abilit}' to undertake graduate study 

Note: Upon admission, smdents must be in compliance with 
immunization requirements of the State of Illinois. Further infor- 
mation is available from the Admissions Office. 

International Applicants 

In addition to meeting the general and specific admission 
requirements, applicants from outside the United States who do 
not hold a US. Passport, must submit a letter of financial support 
or personal guarantee of payment. This allows CTU to issue the 
1-20 necessary to studv in the U.S. 



130 



academic information 

Academic Policies 

Student Classification 

Students are admitted to degree programs after completion of 
admission requirements and prerequisites of the respective pro- 
grams. They are candidates for the degree after completing the 
procedures listed in the respective degree manuals. Continuing 
education students are students who are enrolled but are not seek- 
ing a degree. Special students are those without a baccalaureate 
degree or its academic equivalent. Auditors are students who 
enroll in courses but do not take them for credit. 

Catholic Theological Union follows the semester system. 
There are two 15-week semesters, a 3-week intensive J-Term in 
January, and a 3-week Summer Institute in June. The typical 
course load is 12 credit hours per semester, although students 
enrolling for at least 9 hours per semester are considered full- 
time students. Students who register for less than 9 credits in any 
semester are part-time students. Students are permitted to take 
only one 3 -credit course during the January term. 

Progrann Directors 

Each academic program has a director who is responsible for 
general oversight of the program. The program director insures 
that students enrolled in the program follow the program's 
regulations and procedures. 

Progrann Manuals 

A program manual for each degree program may be obtained 
through the degree program director. The manuals provide 
complete academic information and the official regulations and 



131 



academic information 




Faculty and students 
gather for the annual 

^'Gaudeamus " celebration 
offacultj^lMbikations. 



procedures relevant to each pro- 
gram. Students are responsible for 
becoming acquainted with the 
manual of the degree they are 
pursuing. ^ 

Academic Advisors 
Each student will be assigned an 
academic advisor from the faculty. 
While the academic advisor moni- 
tors the student's progress, the stu- 
dent is responsible for meeting all 
requirements for graduation 
according to the specifications of 
the appropriate program manual. 



Bias-free Language 
All instructors and students are 
expected to use nondiscriminatory 
language when referring to human beings in classroom presenta- 
tions and discussions, in written materials and papers for courses, 
and in theses and projects. While recognizing the complexity of 
the cultural contexts and theological issues around the question 
of how God is named, gender-neutral or gender-balanced lan- 
guage and imagery, insofar as possible, are encouraged when 
referring to God. 



Plagiarism 

Academic integrity demands that a student acknowledge all 

sources employed in the preparation of written assignments, 



132 



academic information 

whether in the use of exact quotations or in substantial reproduc- 
tion of ideas. Failure to do so (plagiarism) normally results in a 
failing grade for the course and may also result in dismissal. 

Registration 

All students are to complete their registration and arrange for 
payment of fees at the time and place announced by the Registrar, 
who provides detailed instructions for registration. 

Students are to plan their registration by consulting their aca- 
demic advisors. The advisor's signature must appear on registra- 
tion forms before the Registrar can accept them. The academic 
advisor and the faculty involved must also approve any change in 
the student's course selection, using a form the student will 
secure from the Registrar. 

Students may choose to complete their registration via a 
secure online form. This form is sent to the student's advisor. 
If approved, the advisor forwards it to the Registrar via e-mail. 
The act of forwarding constitutes approval and substitutes for 
the advisor's signature. 

Adding/Dropping Courses 

Adding or dropping courses is permitted through the first week 

of the semester without academic or financial penalty. 

Auditing Courses 

Instructors may permit auditors to attend their courses. While 
auditors may participate in class discussions, instructors are not 
required to evaluate their written work nor are auditors required 
to take tests or examinations. While audit courses are listed on 
the student's permanent record, no grade is given. Space for 



133 



academic information 

auditors may be limited in some courses. Permission of the aca- 
demic advisor and the instructor involved is necessary to change 
from credit to audit. Information about changing status is avail- 
able from the Registrar. 

Withdrawals 

Students may withdraw from any course up to the end of the 9th 
week of the semester. They are to secure the withdrawal form 
from the Registrar and seek the approval of their academic advi- 
sor and the instructor involved. Withdrawals after the 9th week 
will be noted on the student's record as either "Withdrew 
Passing" (WP) or "Withdrew Failing" (WF). 

Independent Study 

Opportunities for independent study allow students to pursue 
interests not covered by regular course offerings. Interested stu- 
dents may contact a member of the faculty who defines learning 
tasks and course requirements. Students are responsible for com- 
pleting the necessary form before registration. This form is avail- 
able from the Registrar. The courses that are regularly offered 
may not be taken as an independent study during the same semes- 
ter. Independent studies must be taken for credit. The decision to 
accept responsibility for supervising independent studies is left to 
the discretion of faculty members. 

Extensions and Incompletes 

Each instructor sets the deadline for the submission of all course 
work. Students must petition the instructor to receive an incom- 
plete (I), a grade that denotes that the work for a course has not 
been completed by the deadline. An incomplete received in the 



134 



academic information 

fall semester must be removed by the end of the spring semester; 
an incomplete received in the spring must be removed by the start 
of the fall semester. If the student fails to do so, the grade will be 
changed to a "Permanent Incomplete" (PI). In either case, no 
credit is given and the course must be repeated if it is a required 
course. 

Students who do not submit a petition for extension and do 
not complete the course work by the end of the semester will 
receive a "Permanent Incomplete" (PI). 

Students must secure the petition for extension form from the 
Registrar, who can provide additional information on the policies 
and procedures on incompletes. The granting of extensions and 
incompletes is the sole prerogative of the instructor. No instructor 
is required to grant an extension. Continuation of an extension 
can be granted by the Academic Dean. 

Incompletes cannot be given by visiting instructors or by 
instructors who will be on sabbatical leave the following semester. 

Students who have two incompletes or who are on academic 
probation must consult with the Academic Dean before registration. 

Grades 

The instructor is solely responsible for evaluating the course 
work of students and assigning grades. At the end of each semes- 
ter the student will receive a grade report listing the total hours 
accumulated and the cumulative grade point average. The 
Registrar is responsible for distributing the grade reports. 

Instructors assign a letter grade, except in practica courses, 
which follow a pass-fail system. The Registrar uses a numerical 
system to compute the student's grade point average according to 
the following scale: 



135 



academic information 



A range: Excellent work 


A+/A 


4.00 




A- 


3.75 


B range: Good work 


B+ 


3.50 




B 


3.00 


i 


B- 


2.75 


C range: Fair work 


C+ 


2.50 




c 


2.00 




c- 


1.75 


D range: Poor 




1.00 


F: Fail 







WP 




Withdrew Passing 


1 P 




Pass 


WF 




Withdrew Failing 


I 

I'l' 




Incomplete 


1 PI 




Permanent Incomplete 


' N 




No Grade 


Academic Probation 






Students in degree programs must maintain a 3.0 cumulative 



Grade Point Average (GPA) to graduate. Students whose GPA falls 
below 3.0 in two successive semesters are subject to academic 
probation. Students failing to show improvement are subject to 
dismissal. CTU reserves the right to dismiss students whose 
academic progress or adjustment to the school is unsatisfactory. 
Students who are dismissed for academic reasons cannot be 
readmitted to a degree program. 

Advanced Standing 

Students beginning the M.Div and M.A.PS. programs may 

petition to receive advanced standing for previous work in 



136 



academic information 



foundational courses. Students should consult with their 
respective program directors. If the petition is granted, the 
hours in those areas become elective. 

Credit by Examination 

Students in the M.Div. and ^ 

M.A.P.S. programs may peti- 
tion to receive credit by 
examination in some areas in 
their respective programs. 
Interested students may consult 
their respective program 
manuals and directors. 



Transfer of Credit 
Graduate credit in theology, 
completed within the last seven 
years for a grade of "B" or bet- 
ter, may be transferred to 
Catholic Theological Union. 
Ordinarily, no more than 6 
semester hours may be trans- 
ferred into the M.A. and 
M.A.P.S. programs and no 
more than 24 semester hours 
into the M.Div. program. 
Students must consult with 

their program directors in order to transfer credits. Forms for this 
purpose are available from the Registrar. Such credits will be rec- 
ognized only after students have successfully completed one year 



Relaxing in the Dead Sea, 
students take a break from 
their studies in the Holy Land, 

Photo: Lawie Brink, O.R 



137 



academic information 

of academic work. Courses taken as part of CTU-approved coop- 
erative programs are considered CTU credit and are not counted 
as transfer credit. 

Credit by Cross-Registration 

Students enrolled in master's level programs may take courses at 
any school belonging to the Association of Chicago Theological 
Schools at no extra charge and at the University of Chicago with 
a significant reduction of tuition. Credit for courses taken in 
these schools may be applied to CTU degree requirements. 
Students are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity. 
Up to one third of a student's work may be done in these schools. 
By special arrangement this may be increased to one half 

Transfer of Courses Taken after Admission 
After admission students are expected to take courses for their 
degrees at CTU, one of the ACTS schools, or the University of 
Chicago. If a student wishes to take a course elsewhere for credit 
toward a CTU degree, permission must be obtained in advance. 
Students should consult their respective degree program manuals 
and directors for the appropriate procedures. 

Grievances 

There are times in the life of any institution when conflicts may 
arise. The Student Handbook has a detailed description of the 
grievance procedures that deal with such circumstances. These 
procedures are designed to protect the student, the instructor, and 
the administration in the resolution of the grievance. 



138 



academic information 

Graduation 

Students who anticipate completing all the requirements of their 
degree or certificate programs in a particular year must apply 
for graduation with the Registrar during the fall semester of the 
academic year they intend to graduate. Students are responsible 
for completing all requirements of their degree program. The 
Board of Trustees grants degrees upon the recommendation of 
the faculty. 

Transcripts 

A student may request in writing that the Registrar send an 
academic transcript to designated persons or institutions. No 
transcripts are sent without a written request and only when all 
accounts are paid. The first transcript is sent free of charge. 
For all others, payment of the fee must accompany the request. 
Transcripts submitted as part of the admissions process become 
the property of Catholic Theological Union. 



139 



student life 



W 




Through our Campus Renewal 
project, inchufmg amstriiiikm of 
a new academic center, CTU 
offers an outstanding environment 
in which our students can learn, 
pni}\ and imiid community — 
together, making a place far faith. 



140 



student life 

At the heart of CathoHc Theological Union is the academic pro- 
gram, yet there is more to life at CTU than classes. The school 
provides opportunities for worship and a variety of extracurricular 
activities that play an important role in ministerial and personal 
formation. 

Student Services 

Housing coordination for independent students and information 
on health insurance, athletic facilities, and recreational opportu- 
nities are available from the Student Services Coordinator. For 
resources on spiritual direction and counseling, contact the 
Director of Continuing Education. 

Housing 

Catholic Theological Union offers a range of housing options in 
several buildings on Cornell Avenue. Apartment layouts vary 
from studios to one bedrooms, with or without a kitchen, fur- 
nished or unfurnished, walkups, and buildings with elevators. To 
rent an apartment contact Student Services Coordinator no later 
than 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester. Since space is 
limited, submit housing requests as soon as possible after admis- 
sion. If CTU housing is unavailable, students will be assisted in 
finding other suitable, affordable housing in the area. For rental 
rates, availability of apartments, and housing policies and 
regulations, contact Student Services. 

Food Service 

The dining room serves daily breakfast, lunch, and dinner when 
school is in session. 



141 



student life 

University of Chicago Services 

Students at Catholic Theological Union can take advantage of the 
following services offered by the University of Chicago: 
University Health Services, student health insurance, and access 
to the University's Regenstein Library and to its athletic facilities. 
Information is available from Student Services. 

Recreational Facilities 

Both Hyde Park and the city offer a wide range of recreational 
opportunities. Students may use the athletic facilities of the 
University of Chicago for an annual fee. Other public and private 
facilities in the neighborhood offer opportunities for walking, 
jogging, cycling, gold, racquetball, swimming, tennis, and fitness 
exercises. CTU is a short walk from the Lake Michigan, public 
tennis courts, and the lakefront parks. 

Student Representative Council (SRC) 

The Student Representative Council, composed of seminarians, 
laywomen and men, and full- time, part-time, and residential and 
commuting students, is the primary vehicle for student opinion 
and action. Through its representatives on the Student Affairs 
Committee of the Board of Trustees and on faculty and adminis- 
trative committees of the school, the Council insures student 
input on important matters. The Council also organizes social 
activities, cultural sharing events, and educational forums. 
Service on the Council is voluntary. 

Alunnni/ae Relations 

Graduates of all degree and certificate programs are eligible for 
membership in the Alumni/ae Association. Membership dues are 



142 



student life 

payable each spring and cover the following calendar year. 
Membership benefits include a subscription to New Theology 
Review, library privileges, Logos, the CTU newsletter, and a 25 
percent discount on tuition for the Summer Institute. For more 
information, contact the Development Office. 

International Students 

This program welcomes and supports new independent interna- 
tional students. The program offers support to new students in the 
areas of accompaniment, community building, and basic orienta- 
tion regarding the practical aspects of life in the new culture. The 
International Student Coordinator brings to the attention of fac- 
ulty and administration the specific needs of new international 
students. Also, coordinators of international student programs 
from Catholic Theological Union, Lutheran School of Theology, 
and McCormick Theological Seminary cooperatively organize 
regular workshops to assist new students. 



143 



financial information 







.''■'V -,^''^„i.,s^^A^, ._, ^^ „ : 



Although Catholic Theoiogkd 
Uriwifs academic programs are 
the heart of our mission, there is 
much more to being a student 
at CTU than just taking classes. 
When you are apart of CTU, yon 
are part of something special. 



144 



financial information 

Financial Aid 

Catholic Theological Union is committed to providing need- 
based financial aid to make theological and ministerial educa- 
tion accessible. The resources for this financial aid come from 
several scholarship funds. Normally assistance is only available 
to students in degree programs and takes the form of tuition 
remission grants. 

Financial aid is awarded in semester increments for a period 
of one year or less. Awards are renewable based on applications 
submitted by March 15. New students may make an application 
for financial aid with their application for admission. Deadline 
for students matriculating in the fall semester is May 1 . 

While CTU seeks to help students to meet the expenses 
associated with graduate ministerial studies, the ultimate respon- 
sibility for these expenses rests with the student. Other possible 
sources of support are contributions from agencies, dioceses and 
parishes, student loans, and part-time employment. Students 
engaged in ministry who receive tuition grants from their agency, 
diocese, or parish may also qualify for a matching grant in the 
form of tuition remission. Students may also access the 
Fellowships Plus website (www.thefund.org), an on-line catalog 
containing sources of financial assistance. The Admissions 
Office has information regarding student loans. There are also 
opportunities for student employment on campus. 

Note: Students with existing student loans who are with- 
drawing from their academic programs must notify the Registrar 
by letter. V 



145 



financial infornnation 

Scholarships 

There are several scholarships qualified students are encouraged 
to apply for: 

^\ ' , . -^ '_ 

The Bemardin Scholarships 

The Bernardin Scholarships are available to M.A. and D.Min. 
students who wish to focus on Cardinal Bernardin 's legacy and 
theology in the light of the Second Vatican Council. Areas of 
concentration include: reconciliation, promotion of the vision of 
the church, the Consistent Ethic of Life, the search for Common 
Ground, the strengthening of the Catholic-Jewish or Catholic- 
Muslim dialogue, and exploration of healthcare issues and pas- 
toral care. Contact the Bernardin Center for information. 

The International Women's Scholarship Fund 
The International Women's Scholarship Fund offers one-year 
scholarships covering tuition, books, and housing. This fund 
benefits women from third world countries or developing nations 
who are seeking credentials for Roman Catholic ministries in 
their countries. 

The Augustus Tolton Scholarship Fund 
The Augustus Tolton Scholarship Fund supports lay African- 
American students preparing for ministry in the Archdiocese of 
Chicago. Contact the Director of the Augustus Tolton Program 
for further information. 



146 



financial infornnation 

The Oscar Romero Scholarship Fund 
The Oscar Romero Scholarship Fund supports lay Hispanics 
preparing for ministry in the Archdiocese of Chicago. Contact the 
Director of the Oscar Romero Program for further information. 

Other scholarships, administered through the general scholarship 
fund include: 

Mother Mary Catherine McAuley Scholarship Fund 

The Mother Mary Catherine McAuley Scholarship Fund benefits 

women students studying for ministry. 

The Carroll Stuhlnnueller Scholarship Fund 
Carroll Stuhlmueller Scholarship Fund supports students concen- 
trating in biblical spirituality (international women students 
receive first consideration). 

The Dennis Geaney Scholarship Fund 
The Dennis Geaney Scholarship Fund supports lay students of 
ministry. Applications forms are available through the 
Admissions Office. 

Ministers in the Vicinity 

This program allows persons already engaged in ministry from 
the Chicagoland area to audit three courses over a two-year 
period for a reduced tuition rate. Application for the Ministers 
in the Vicinity Program are available from the Director of 
Continuing Education. The student must also complete the 
general admission requirements and be admitted. 



147 



financial information 

Information on scholarships is available through the Admissions 
Office. 

Payment Policy 

Tuition, fees, and other student expenses are subject to annual 
review and are subject to change. 

Payment of tuition and fees is due on the first day of each 
semester. Late payment (after 30 days) is subject to a one percent 
per month penalty on the unpaid balance. Students may request 
special payment plans by contacting the Comptroller at the 
beginning of the semester. Students with unpaid balances in one 
semester may register for the following semester on a conditional 
basis. Unpaid balances cannot be carried past the following 
semester or into the next academic year. Catholic Theological 
Union reserves the right to withhold registration, library privi- 
leges, transfer of credits, diplomas, and transcripts until all 
charges and penalties have been paid in full. 

Refund Policy 

When withdrawing from courses, students are to follow proce- 
dures set out by the Registrar. Refunds are available according to 
the following schedule: 

Through the first week of the semester full refund 

Through the second week of the semester 75 percent refund 

Through the third week of the semester 50 percent refund 

Through the fourth week of the semester 25 percent refund 

As of the fifth week of the semester, refunds are not granted, 
except for situations deemed to be unusual emergencies by the 



148 



financial information 



Executive Committee. 



Continuation Fee 

Students who complete all course work for their degrees must 
register every semester until they complete all other requirements 
for graduation. They pay a nominal continuation fee connected 
with this registration. The continuing students who make regular 
use of the library and faculty advisement are charged a slightly 
higher fee. 



149 



appendix 




CTU is a community of diverse 
people who share a common 
pursuit Faculty, students, and 
staff members alike are united 
in their quest for unparalleled 
academic excellence, relevant 
ministerial leadership^ and a 
life of devoted sei'vice. 



150 



appendix 



For information, please call the main number or the offices listed. For further information 
on telephones and e-mail addresses visit the website of Catholic Theological Union. 



Catholic Theological Union 
5401 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60615.5698 



Tel: 773.324.8000 
Fax: 773.324.8490 
Web: www.ctu.edu 



ADMINISTRATION 

President 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Vice President and Academic Dean 

Director of Continuing Education 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

Director of the Bechtold Library 

Registrar 

Director of Development 

Director of Maintenance 

Director of Marketing & Communications 



Rev. Donald Senior, C.R 

Michael Connors 

Rev Gary Riebe-Estrella, S.VD 

Dr. Opal Easter 

Kathleen Van Duser ■ 

Rev Kenneth O'Malley, C.R 

Maria de Jesus Lemus 

William Booth 

Daniel Ryan 

Pattie Wigand Sporrong 



CONTACT INFORMATION 
Academic Dean's Office: 
Admissions and Financial Aid 
Bechtold Library: 
Continuing Education 
Emmaus Lay Formation: 
Registrar and Transcripts 
Student Services and Housing 



773.753.5306 
773.753.5316 
773.753.5321 
773.753.5337 
773.753.7475 
773.753.5320 
773.753.5312 



151 



appendix 



COMMUNITIES PARTICIPATING 
IN THE UNION 

Canons Regular of the Order of the Holy 
Cross (Crosiers) 

* U.S.A. Province of St. Odilia 

Canons Regular of Premontre (Norbertines) 

* St. Norbert Abbey 

Capuchin Franciscan Friars (Capuchins) 

* Province of St. Joseph 

Claretian Missionaries (Claretians) 

* Eastern Province 

Clerics of St. Viator (Viatorians) 

* Province of the United States 

Comboni Missionaries of the Heart of Jesus 

* North American Province 

Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament 

* Province of St. Ann 

Congregation of the Holy Ghost (Spiritans) 
*Eastern Province 

Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians) 
Midwest Province 

Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer 
(Redemptorists) 

* Denver Province 



Missionaries of the Precious Blood 

* Cincinnati Province 

* Kansas City Province 

Missionaries of the Sacred Heart 

* United States Province 

Missionaries of St. Charles (Scalabrinians) 

* St. John the Baptist Province 

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate 

* United States Province 

Missionary Society of St. Columban 

* United States Region 

Order of Friar Ser\/ants of Mary (Servites) 

* United States of America Province . 

Order of Friars Minor Conventual 
St. Bonaventure Province 

Order of Friars Minor (Franciscan Friars) 

* Assumption BVM Province 

* Province of the Sacred Heart 

* St. John the Baptist Province 

Order of St. Augustine 

*Province of Our Mother of Good Counsel 

*Province of St. Augustine 

*Province of St. Thomas of Villanova 

*Province of St. Thomas Villanova 

Priests of the Sacred Heart 
Hales Corner 



Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri 

(Oratorians) 

Rock Hill Province 

Congregation of the Passion (Passionists) 

* Holy Cross Province 

* St. Paul of the Cross Province 

Discalced Carmelite Friars 
Immaculate Heart of Mary Province 

Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers 

* U.S. Foundation 



Society of the Divine Word 

* Chicago Province 

Xaverian Missionaries 

* United States of America Province 

* Corporate Member of Catholic Theological 
Union 



152 



appendix 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Officers 

Rev. Thomas P. Reynolds, S.S.C. Chair 
Society of St. Columban, United States Region, 
Chicago 

Rev. James E. Michaletz, C.5.V. Vice Chair 
Maternity BVM Parish, Bourbonnais, 111. 

Marjorie H. Stephan, Secretary 
Manager, American Engineering and 
Management Corporation, Chicago 



Members 

Rev. Thomas Aldworth, O.F.M. 

Order of Friars Minor, Province of the Sacred 

Heart, Chicago 

Rev Richard Bayuk, CPRS. 

Society of the Precious Blood, Kansas City 

Province, Chicago 

Robert L Berner, Jn 

Partner, Baker & McKenzie, Chicago 

Rev Paul Bernier, 5.S.S. 
Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament, 
Province of St. Ann, Cleveland, Oh. 

Thomas J. Boodell, Jr 

Partner, Boodell and Domanskis, LLP, Chicago 

Rev. Bernard L Carlin, CSs.R. 
Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, 
Denver Province, Chicago 

Dr Donna M. Carroll 

President, Dominican University, River Forest, 

111. 

Rev Dennis Chriszt, CPRS. 

Missionaries of the Precious Blood, Cincinnati 

Province, Chicago 



Rev David Cinquegrani, C.P 

Retreat Director, Holy Family Passionist Retreat 

Center, West Hartford, Conn. 

Rev Theodore Cirone, C.M.F. 
Co-Director, Claret Center for Psychological 
Counseling & Spiritual Direction, Chicago 

Eleanor Clarke . 

Lake Forest, 111. 

Rev Andrew Cribben, O.Praem 
Canons Regular of Premontre, St. Norbert 
Abbey, De Pere, Wise. 

Dn Richard A. DeGraff 
[Retired] Lisle, 111. 

James M. Denny 
JMD Investors, Chicago 

Rev Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. 
Missionaries of the Sacred Heart, United States 
Province, Aurora, 111. 

Rev David Donnay o.s.c. 

Crosier Fathers and Brothers, U.S.A., Province 

of St. Odilia, Shoreview, Minn. 

Daniel J. Foley 

Senior Vice President - Investment Executive, 

Royal Bank of Canada - Dain Rauscher, Chicago 

Rev Dariusz Garbaciak, S.V.D. 

Society of the Divine Word, Chicago Province, 

Techny, 111. 

Teresita Gonzales-Lowry 

Communications and Development Associate, 

Chicago Youth Centers, Chicago 

Rev Michael Guimon, O.5.M. 

Order of Friar Servants of Mary, United States 

of America Province, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fred Hofheinz 

[Retired] Lilly Endowment, Inc., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 



153 



appendix 



Rev. CI audio Holier, c.s. 

Pastor, St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Melrose 

Park, 111. 

Rev. Thomas Horan, O.M.I. 

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, United 

States Province, Chicago 

Br. William R. Hugo, Capuchin 

Capuchin Fransciscan Friars, Province of St. 

Joseph, Chicago 

Rev. TodS. Laverty, O.F.M. 

Order of Friars Minor, St. John the Baptist 

Province, Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Sebastian MacDonald, CR 
Congregation of the Passion, Holy Cross 
Province, San Antonio, Tex. 

Rev Stephen E. Malkiewicz, O.F.M. 
Order of Friars Minor, Assumption B VM 
Province, Franklin, Wise. 

Rev Christopher McDermott, C.S.Sp. 
Holy Ghost Prep School, Bensalem, Penn. 

Dr Richard J. Meister 

Professor, DePaul University, Chicago 

Daniel R. Murray 

Partner, Jenner & Block, L.L.C., Chicago 

Rev John B. Northrop, M.M. 

Co-Director - Orientation Program Maryknoll 

Father and Brothers, U.S. Foundation, New York 

Thomas M. Owens 

Owens Foundation, Palos Heights, 111. 

Carolyn Noonan Parmer 
Winnetka, 111. 

Rev Aniello Salicone, S.X. 

St. Therese Catholic Chinese Mission, Chicago 

Sr Katarina Schuth, O.S.F. 
Endowed Chair for the Social Scientific Study of 
Religion, The St. Paul Seminary, University of 
St. Thomas, Minnesota 



Rev Donald Senior, CR ex officio 

President, Catholic Theological Union, Chicago 

Rev Michael Slattery, O.S.A. 

Order of St. Augustine, Province of Our Mother 

of Good Counsel, New Lenox, 111. 

Fidelis N. Umeh 

Chairman, Versay Solution, LLC, Deerfield, 111. 

Mary-Frances Veeck 
Chicago 

Rev Thomas Vermiglio, M. C.C.J 
Comboni Missionaries of the Heart of Jesus, 
North American Province, LaGrange Park, 111. 



Emeritus Trustees 

Hon. Richard D. Cudahy 

United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh 

Circuit, Chicago 

James Haugh, 
Hinsdale, 111. 

William Lawlor, III, 
Kenilworth, 111. 

John J. McHugh 

Attorney, Michael Best & Friedrich, Chicago 

William E. Reidy 
Winnetka, 111. 

Peggy Roach 
Waukegan, 111. 

Edmund A. Stephan, Jr 
Lincolnshire, 111. 

Barry Sullivan 

Partner, Jenner & Block, L.L.C. Chicago, 111. 



154 



appendix 



ACCREDITATION 

Incorporated in the State of Illinois as an Institution 
of Higher Education, November 27, 1967. 

Approved as a degree-granting institution by the 
Department of Higher Education, State of 
Illinois, September 1969. 

Accredited by the Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada [ATS], 
January 1972. ATS; 10 Summit Park Drive; 
Pittsburgh, PA 16275-1 103; (412) 788-6505. 

Accredited by the North Central Association of 
College and Secondary Schools [NCA], March 
1972. NCA; 30 N. LaSalle St., Suite 2400; 
Chicago, IL 60602-2504. (312) 263-2456. 



Approved for Veterans= Benefits, Title 38, U.S. 
Code, Chapter 36, September 23, 1970. 

Authorized under Federal Law to enroll non- 
immigrant alien students, October 28, 1971. 

Qualified as a non-profit, tax exempt institution 
pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code, section 
501(c)(3). 

Member of the National Catholic Educational 
Association, the Association of Clinical Pastoral 
Education, the Midwest Association of 
Theological Schools, and the Association of 
Chicago Theological Schools 



THE ASSOCIATION OF 
CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL 
SCHOOLS 

Catholic Theological Union 

(Roman Catholic) 

5401 South Cornell Ave., Chicago, 111. 60615 

Tel: 773.324.8000 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

(United Church of Christ) 

5757 South University Ave, Chicago, 111. 60637 

Tel: 773.752.5757 

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
(United Methodist) 

2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston, 111. 60201 
Tel: 847.866.3900 

Loyola University of Chicago Institute of 

Pastoral Studies 

(Roman Catholic) 

820 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 6061 1 

312.915.7400 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
(Evangelical Lutheran Church in America) 
1 100 East 55th St., Chicago, 111. 60615 
Tel: 773.256.0700 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
(Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.) 



5460 South University Ave., Chicago, 111. 60615 
Tel: 773.947.6300 

Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
(Unitarian Universalist Association) 
5701 South Woodlawn Ave., Chicago, 111. 60637 
Tel: 773.256.3000 

North Park Theological Seminary 
(Evangelical Covenant Church) 
3225 West Foster Ave., Chicago, 111. 60625-4895 
Tel: 773.244.6210 

Northern Seminary 

(American Baptist Churches) 

660 East Butterfield Rd., Lombard, 111. 60148 

Tel: 630.620.2100 

Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
(Episcopal Church) 

2122 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, III 60201 
Tel: 847.328.9300 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
(Evangelical Free Church) 
2065 Half Day Rd., Deerfield, 111. 60015-1283 
Tel: 847.945.8800 

University of St. Mary of the Lake, Mundelein 

Seminary 

(Roman Catholic) 

1000 East Maple, Mundelein, IL 60060-1 174 

Tel: 847.566.6401 



155 



appendix 



Directions 

Catholic Theological Union is located on the 
southeast corner of 54th Street and Cornell 
Avenue in Chicago. CTU is accessible from 
Lake Shore Drive, the Dan Ryan Expressway 
(190-94), and the Chicago Skyway (190). 

Lake Shore Drive (from the south) 

Take Lake Shore Drive north. 

Exit at 57th Street. 

Go west on 57^^ St. to Hyde Park Boulevard. 

Turn north (right) on Hyde Park Boulevard and 

proceed to 54th Street. 

Turn west (left) on 54th Street to Cornell 

Avenue. 

Lake Shore Drive (from the north) 

Take Lake Shore Drive south. 

Exit at 53rd Street. 

Go west on 53^"" St. to Cornell Avenue. 

Turn south (left) on Cornell Avenue and proceed 

Map of Neighborhood 



to 54th Street. Dan Ryan Expressway (190-94) 

(from north or south) 

Exit at Garfield Boulevard (55th Street). 

Turn east on Garfield Boulevard and continue 

east bound.. 

In Washington Park, follow the sign for 55th 

Street. 

Turn east (right) on 55th and proceed east to 

Cornell Avenue. 

Turn north (left) on Cornell Avenue and proceed 

to 54th Street. 

Chicago Skyway (1-90) 

Exit at Stony Island. 

Take Stony Island north to 56th Street. 

Turn east (right) on 56th to Cornell Avenue. 

Turn north (left) on Cornell Avenue and proceed 

to 54th Street. 



Catholic Theological Union 

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156 



appendix 



Academic Calendar 

2005-2006 

Fall Semester 
September 6 Classes begin 
November 24-27 Thanksgiving break 
December 19 Semester Ends 

J Term 

January 9-28 J Term Intensives 

January 16 Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

Spring Semester 

Feburary 6 Classes begin 

April 9-16 Holy Week/Easter Recess 

May 1 8 Graduation 

May 20 Semester ends 

Summer Institute 
June 5-23 

2006-2007 

September 5 Classes begin 
November 23-26 Thanksgiving break 
December 1 8 Semester ends 

J Term 

January 8-27 J Term Intensives 

January 15 Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

Spring Semester 

Feburary 5 Classes begin 

April 1-8 Holy Week/Easter Recess 

May 1 7 Graduation 

May 19 Semester ends 

Summer Institute 
June 4-22 



157 



ndex 



A Diverse Neighborhood 

Academic Advisors 

Academic Calendar 

Academic Information 

Academic PoHcies 

Academic Probation 

Academic Programs 

Accreditation 

Adding/Dropping Courses 

Administration 

Admission and Advancement Criteria 

Admissions Policies 

Advanced Standing 

Alumni/ae Relations 

Appendix 

Association of Chicago Theological 

Schools, The 
Auditing Courses 
Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry 

Program, The 
Augustus Tolton Scholarship Fund, The 

B 

Bechtold Library, The 
Bernardin Center for Theology 

and Ministry, The 
Bernardin Scholarship Program, The 
Bernardin Scholarships, The 
Bias-free Language 
Biblical Spirituality, Certificate in 
Biblical Study and Travel 
Board of Trustees, The 

C 

Campus, The 

Catholic-Jewish Studies 

Catholic-Muslim Studies 

Center for the Study of Religious Life 

Center of Centers 

Certificate Programs 

Certificate Programs, Continuing Education 

and Special Students, Specific 

Admissions Requirements 
Chicago Center for Global Ministries, The 
Claret Center Internship in Spiritual 

Direction 
Communities Participating in the Union 152 





Contact Information 


151 


10 


Continuation Fee 


149 


Continuing Education 


65 


1 JZi 

1 '\1 


Course Offerings 


78 


ID / 
194 


Credit by Cross-Registration 


138 


131 


Credit by Examination 


137 


Cross-Cultural Mission, Certificate in 


63 


1:)0 

38 

155 


Cross-Cultural Transformation 


70 


Curriculum, The 


40 


133 
151 


D 




125 


Degree Programs 


42 


125 


Directions 


156 


137 


Doctor of Ministry Program, Specific 




142 


Admissions Requirements 


129 


150 


Dual Degrees 

Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Program 


39 


155 


(D.Min.) 


59 


133 


Educational Technology 
Emmaus Program for Continuing 


12 


20 


Lay Formation 


18 


146 


Evening and Weekend Classes 


66 




Extensions and Incompletes 


134 


11 


F 






Faculty 


22 


13 


Financial Aid 


145 


14 


Financial Information 


144 


146 


Food Service 


141 


132 


Formation Council 


20 


63 






74 


G 




153 


General Academic M.A. 


56 




General Admission Requirements 


126 




General information 


6 


11 


Grades 


134 


14 


Graduation 


139 


15 


Grievances 


138 


17 
16 


H 




62 


Health Care Mission Leadership, 




, 


Certificate in 


63 




Hesburgh Sabbatical, The 


67 


130 


Hispanic Ministry 


71 


16 


History: In the Spirit of Vatican II 


7 




Holy Land Retreat, The 


74 


73 


Housing 


141 



158 



appendix 



I 

Identity: A Vision for the Church 
Independent Study 
Individually-Designed Sabbatical 
Institute for Black Catholic Studies, The 
Institute for Liturgical Consultants 
Institute for Sexuality Studies, The 
Institute of Religious Formation, The 
International Applicants, Specific 

Admissions Requirements 
International Students 
International Women's Scholarship 

Fund, The 
Introduction: Out of the Ordinary 
Israel and Jordan Study Program 
Italy Study 



Liturgical Studies, Certificate in 
Liturgies and Prayer 
Louvain Study 

M 

Management Skills for Ministry 
Master of Arts Program 
Master of Arts Program, 

Specific Admissions Requirements 
Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program 

(M.A.RS.) 
Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies Program, 

Specific Admissions Requirements 
Master of Divinity Program (M.Div.), The 
Master of Divinity Program, Specific 

Admissions Requirements 
Ministry Study Programs 
Mission: Witness to the Gospel 

N 

National Capital Semester for Seminarians 
Native American Ministries 
Neighborhood Map 
New Theology Review 

O 

Off Campus Learning 
Oscar Romero Scholars Program, The 
Oscar Romero Scholarship Fund, The 
Overseas Training Program 



134 
68 

73 
72 
17 
69 

130 
143 

146 

7 
74 
76 



64 
21 
76 



66 

53 

128 
48 



Pastoral Studies, Certificate in 64 

Payment Policy 148 

Plagiarism 132 

President's Letter 4 

Program Directors . 131 

Program Manuals 131 

R 

Recreational Facilities ■ 142 

Reftind Policy . - 148 

Registration 133 

Research M.A. 54 

S 

Sabbaticals 67 

Scholarships 146 

Setting: "City of Big Shoulders" ' 9 

Special Programs and Resources 13 

Specific Admissions Requirements 126 

Spiritual Formation Programs 17 

Spiritual Formation 64 

Spirituality Studies 71 

Student Classification 1 3 1 

Student Life 140 

Student Representative Council (SRC) 142 

Student Services 141 

Study Abroad Programs 74 

Summer Institute, The 67 



ill 
42 


T 

Tamale Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies 


76 


126 


Theology Degrees 


39 


69 
8 


Transcripts 

Transfer of Courses Taken after 


139 




Admission 


138 




Transfer of Credit 


137 


73 

71 

156 


U 

University of Chicago Services 


142 


21 


w 






Withdrawals 


134 


65 


World Mission Program 


69 


19 






147 






74 







159 



^1 



JiCSm I am interested in learning more about Catholic Theological Union. 
-^ Contact me. □ Send application materials. □ Arrange a campus visit. 

I am interested in the following program(s): □ Doctor of Ministry □ M.A. Theology 

□ Master of Divinity □ M.A.Pastorai Studies □ Sabbatical □ Continuing Education 

□ Hesburgh Sabbatical □ Biblical Travel/Study □ Formation Ministry 

Certificate: □ Biblical Spirituality □ Cross-Cuitural Ministry □ Liturgical Studies 

□ Spiritual Formation □ Pastoral Studies □ Health Care Mission 

Name 



Address 


City 


State 


Country 


Zip 


Phone (day) 


(eve) 


(E-mai!) 





I plan to begin studies: month year 

jLCS* I am interested in learning more about Catholic Theological Union, 
-^ Contact me. □ Send application materials. □ Arrange a campus visit. 

I am interested in the following program{s): □ Doctor of Ministry □ MA Theology 

□ Master of Divinity □ M.A.Pastorai Studies □ Sabbatical □ Continuing Education 

□ Hesburgh Sabbatical □ Biblical Travel/Study □ Formation Ministry 

Certificate: □ Biblical Spirituality □ Cross-Cultural Ministry □ Liturgical Studies 

□ Spiritual Formation □ Pastoral Studies □ Health Care Mission 

Name 



Address 


City 


State 


Country 


Zip 


Phone (day) 


(eve) 


(E-mail) 





I plan to begin studies: month year 



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IF MAILED 

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BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 
FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 94949 CHICAGO, IL 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

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BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 
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Catholic Theological Union 
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Chicago, Illinois 60615-5698 



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NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 




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CATHOLIC 

THEOLOGICAL 

UNION, 




A graduate school of theology and ministry 

5401 South Cornell avenue Chicago, IL 60615 
ph 773.324.8000 fx 773.324.3414 www.ctu.edu